Gundy, OSU Players Say Close Games Mentally Draining So Far

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. One sort of unintended benefit of the bye week (which I had not thought of) is that it gives a team that has been mentally taxed time to recharge their bodies but also their minds. Deion Imade brought this up in his excellent post on how players view bye weeks.Another thing that you might not think about though is it’s also is time for you to recover and take a break mentally. Get away, see family and friends, maybe even go partake in some normal college student activities and have some fun outside of the football facilities.Five of OSU’s six games thus far have been mentally draining for various reasons. CMU obviously. Pitt because of the play stoppage and close game. Baylor (same). Texas because it’s Texas. And Iowa State because you had to dig out of a big hole late in the game.“There’s been 10 weeks – all of August, all of September and then half of October,” said Mike Gundy. “Then this season with the Central Michigan situation, playing well enough to win at Baylor outside of about five plays, obviously Pitt, then a big win against Texas because it’s big for them when they beat Texas because so many of them are from Texas. Then coming back from as far as we did last week. It’s just a lot of wear and tear mentally.”Zach Crabtree compared this year to other seasons he has played.“My redshirt freshman year was pretty draining when we played Florida State that year, and then we had our five-game slide and didn’t really get a win there, so that was rough,” said Zach Crabtree on Wednesday. “I don’t know which one was worse, but it’s definitely been mentally draining going week-to-week. We’ve been in some dog fights, and when you get into dog fights like that, you have to embrace it and have fun with it, but it can definitely wear on you a little bit.”Jordan Sterns, who missed the ISU game with an injury and needs to recover physically and mentally, agreed.“That’s a great point,” said Sterns. “I wouldn’t say it’s emotional, the up and down season we have had. Last year was emotional and draining as well. The 17-0 game against Iowa State and all those games we were losing and we had to come back from. We kind of get used to that. I think it just happens sometimes.“You get in that physical grind and practice every day and such a grind on your body and your mind, it’s hard to stay focused that long. That’s why bye weeks are important and a critical part of the process and just using that time to get back to whether you want to get your body a little bit bigger and stronger. It is a big time to get your mind right.”OSU needs to do that in a big way with a monstrous five-game stretch upcoming before another bye week and Bedlam.last_img read more

Mike Gundy Kind of Wants To Be Kansas State, Doesn’t He?

first_imgI talked with Carson Cunningham about this on our podcast (listen at 5:55 below) — I think of all the Big 12 teams Mike Gundy could choose to model his program after, Kansas State would be the one he would pick. Or the one he has picked.Think about it with me here.What does Mike Gundy preach over and over and over again in countless press conferences and radio hits and on-field interviews?Protect the ballHave sounds special teamsRun it over and over againThat sounds like a poster Bill Snyder has hanging in his office. Which are the top two teams in turnover margin in the Big 12? You guessed it.screen-shot-2016-11-08-at-3-19-10-pmWhat have been the biggest post-Dana, post-Monken complaints about Gundy?He’s gone too conservativeNo he’s REALLY too conservative against OUThere are innumerable rumors about Gundy’s relationships with various offensive coordinators over the last decade at Oklahoma State, but the prevailing narrative is how much he hates risk. I believe this, too. Think about it. Gundy is a CEO. What is a CEO’s job? Mitigate risk. Get everybody on the same page. Don’t take too many chances.Heck, he said this on Monday when talking about recruiting two-year (Juco) players.“We’ve not brought as many in as we had years ago,” said Gundy. “I think we’ve done a pretty good job of evaluating them, their character, and how they will fit into our program – whether they’ll make that adjustment with the structure we have.“It’s a little bit of a risky business just based on our system and how we are with accountability and our structure. We don’t vary much here.”There you go.Here’s more of Gundy going so conservative it makes Ted Cruz look like a raging liberal. This time he was talking about Kansas State coach Bill Snyder’s decision to not go for it on fourth down late in the game last week.“I do not have any grounds to doubt something that Coach [Bill] Snyder would do,” said Gundy. “I mean obviously he knows more about his team than I do. Traditionally, for years, he has played percentages. He is somewhat of a genius when it comes to that and I am guessing in his world that is what he thought was best.”A genius when it comes to percentages!Do you see what’s happening here. Gundy has brought in an offensive coordinator he has more control over, preaches ball security and tempo control and is uncomfortable with throwing the deep ball as often as OSU has in recent years (something he said a few weeks ago).Here’s the thing: All of this works.Usually.It works because when you have more talent than other teams and you protect the ball and don’t take chances, more often than not you’re going to win. You almost always beat the Iowa States and Kansas States and Texas Techs of the world. Or Gundy has anyway.He’s recruited at a top four level in the Big 12 and has been a top four Big 12 team traditionally. Where the model breaks down is against OU. Or against Baylor in recent years Against teams with far more talent. And Gundy seems to think that he can just maintain the status quo and do what he always does against those teams even though everyone can see that from a talent standpoint OSU is an extreme underdog.There is not much tweaking that needs to be done though. Do what you’ve been doing against the lesser teams and then flip it around and take a few chances against OU and Baylor. Run a fake punt (when is the last time OSU ran a fake punt?) Try something, anything.Yes, I believe Mike Gundy wants to be Kansas State, tucked in windbreakers and all, and that’s working out pretty splendidly.But get back to me on December 3. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Barry J. Sanders Named Big 12 Special Teams Player of the Week

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. In the final game of the regular season, Barry J. Sanders had his breakout game on special teams for the Cowboys. He was named Big 12 special teams player of the week for his performance.#Big12FB: Sanders set career bests with 138 all-purpose yards and a 56-yard kickoff return in the @CowboyFB’s game at Oklahoma. pic.twitter.com/RoC2PQMZ1r— Big 12 Conference (@Big12Conference) December 5, 2016Sanders recorded 138 all-purpose yards, including kickoff returns of 56 yards and 49 yards that put Oklahoma State in favorable field position. The biggest return came just before the half, with the teams tied at 17 with under a minute remaining.screenflick-movie-209Unfortunately OSU wasn’t able to parlay the return into points. Instead they elected to run the clock out rather than trying to steal points before the half and capitalize on the big gain.The two returns were not only the best of his career, but also the longest kickoff returns for OSU the entire season.last_img read more

Bringing the Heat

first_imgTouch Football Australia caught up with Tim Wyld, the State Operations Manager for Touch Football South Australia (TFSA) while he was at the X-Blades National Youth Championships at Port Macquarie.We had a chat with Tim to find out more about Touch Football in South Australia.Touch Football Australia (TFA): How is Touch Football going in South Australia?Tim Wyld (TW): It is getting a lot stronger. We’ve increased our participation over the years, which has been really positive at grassroots level. That’s slowly starting to transition into enhanced elite or high performance at nationals.TFA: How many affiliates and registered players are there?TW: We have 17 affiliates and a lot of them are centrally managed by the office [Touch Football South Australia] and registered players we have just over 9000.TFA: When did Touch Football begin in South Australia?TW: The early 80s. Over the last couple of years it has flowed throughout that 20-year period. But we sort of went backwards for a few years there but we have sort of got on the right track now and it is really good, it is growing again.TFA: What kind of challenges have there been to establish the sport in South Australia?TW: I think the whole unitary model challenge sort of shake things up a bit. It was a time of uncertainty at the affiliate level. We are always up against it with some of the larger codes, AFL in particular, but recent years we have been getting into the schools system a lot more and that’s where we are seeing our growth come from school-based participation.TFA: To have that system in place, it’s really important isn’t?TW: Absolutely. We have recently signed four more agreements with the school bodies to integrate that participation at that level, so we have more of an influence and we can do TID [Talent Identification] and or get them into a team at grassroots level.TFA: What benefits does Touch Football South Australia get out from competing at the X-Blades National Youth Championships?TW: First and foremost the participation aspects of it. But we are seeing with our girls program, we are not here to make up the numbers. The girls have had a fantastic tournament, taking it to all the top Queensland and New South Wales teams and they continue to do that, and that is the aim. For the boys, they’re probably back a couple of pegs but it’s about improving their game, and slowly but surely getting them up to speed.Make sure you stay up to date with these websites for all the X-Blades National Youth Championships action: X-Blades National Youth Championships – www.soo.mytouchfooty.comTouch Football Australia – www.austouch.com.auTouch Football Australia’s YouTube channel – www.youtube.com/touchfootballausTwitter: www.twitter.com/touchfootyausFacebook: www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustralia Related LinksBringing the Heatlast_img read more