Eastern athletes ready to shine

first_imgArch-rivals St Mary High and Buff Bay High are again expected to fight for the title at the second meet of the 2017 Digicel Grand Prix Athletics Series, the Eastern Championships, at the UWI-Usain Bolt Track tomorrow.The head coach of Titchfield High, Julian Ivy, welcomes the Digicel Grand Prix initiative, calling it “a wonderful idea.”Most of the schools in the Eastern region are really strapped for cash,” he said.”The eastern region is looked upon as the least in track and field in Jamaica. However, we’ve produced a lot of top athletes who have gone on to excel at the highest international level; and we’ve to understand that before they got to that stage, these coaches aided their development,” Ivy added.Some of the most notable include Morant Bay High alumnus Juliet Cuthbert, who won sprint double silver at the Barcelona Olympics; and another Morant Bay High star – who later transferred to Kingston College – sprint hurdler Hansle Parchment. Parchment won bronze at the London 2012 Olympics and silver at the 2015 World Championships in Beijing, China.Competition away from their training grounds this season has been sparse for most schools participating at the Eastern Championships, but St Mary High’s boys and girls have shown all-round strength at some of the development meets.These include The Queen’s Grace Jackson Invitational and Camperdown Classic, with Class Two girls Keresa Richardson, Janaeli Campbell and Kay-ann James looking dominant among the Eastern Championship entrants, along with Class Two boy Lenard Hall.PARTICULARLY STRONGThe latter is particularly strong in the 800m, where his female colleagues also appear quite strong in Classes One and Two, with Tameria Howell (Class Two) and Shanice Panton (Class One) headlining their charge.Among the boys’ sprinters, Morant Bay’s Jaheim Henry and Annotto Bay’s Kenoy Francis have done fairly well and should be among the Class Two front-runners, with St Mary High’s Travis Henry and Nicardo Vincent also expected to shine.Among Class One girls, Morant Bay’s Tishelle Fulcott and Nneka Francis, along with Oberlin High’s Latoya Graham, should feature.Though Buff Bay High have not shown their hand, they have gone toe to toe with St Mary High for the championship in recent years and are expected to feature big time again.”Right now, it’s between Buff Bay and St Mary High,” Ivy predicted. “Morant Bay will be coming strong as well.”We (Titchfield) are not expecting to be in the top three, as we’ve a fairly young team.”Nonetheless, Ivy said his Class One boys, Kai Chang and Moses Parkinson, will place high in the Class One Digicel Grand Prix Championship events, the high jump and discus.The Digicel Grand Prix Championship events are the 100m, 200m, 400m, 800m, long jump, high jump, discus and 4x400m relays for Classes One and Two boys’ and girls.The series consists of five meets and the top two athletes from each of the Digicel Grand Prix Championship events will advance to the final, the G.C. Foster Classics, which will be held at the National Stadium on March 11.Each athlete can only participate in one individual event at the final, which carries a grand prize of $1 million dollars in gym equipment for the top boys’ and girls’ schools, $500,000 for second, and $250,000 for third.last_img read more

Imus firing may jeopardize charity

first_imgImus said he and his wife, Deirdre, are round-the-clock surrogate parents to the youngsters who spend a week at the property, nearly half of whom are from minority groups and 10 percent are black. “There’s not an African-American parent on the planet who has sent their child to the Imus Ranch who didn’t trust me and trust my wife,” he said on his show. “And when these kids die, we don’t just go to the white kid’s funeral.” Kansas horseman Rob Phillips says he still plans to give the ranch proceeds from a 500-mile charity race he’s staging this fall. But Phillips worries that without Imus’ radio forum, the ranch and other charities will suffer. Stamp said donations may increase in the short term because of the heightened attention – “the celebrity factor ratcheted up to a new level.” The Imus show’s annual two-day fundraising radiothon, benefiting the ranch and two charities that refer children to it, had raised more than $2.3 million as of Friday, according to Deirdre Imus, who hosted Friday’s show. But in the long term, Stamp predicted the firing would cause “irreparable harm.” The ranch’s list of contributors is not public information, but it has relied heavily on corporate contributions. The Reader’s Digest Foundation gave $1 million seven years ago, Imus has said, and American Express made a one-time, $250,000 donation nine years ago. Neither company is a contributor now, representatives said. General Motors Corp. said Friday it would continue donating Chevrolet Suburbans for the ranch. The Hackensack University Medical Center in New Jersey provides the doctors, nurses and “child life specialists” who attend every ranch session. “While there is no excuse for these comments, we cannot overlook all of the good he has done for families of Bergen County and across the nation,” the medical center said in a statement. The nearly 4,000-acre ranch, at the foot of a mesa about 50 miles from Santa Fe, features a re-creation of the main street of a 19th-century Western town, a swimming pool, an indoor horse-riding arena, an outdoor rodeo arena, and barns. Kids between 10 and 17 who have cancer or serious blood disorders, or who have lost siblings to sudden infant death syndrome, spend seven days at the ranch – in the summer, when Imus would broadcast from a studio there – at no cost to their families. They do daily chores, learn to ride and care for horses, and help feed cattle, sheep, buffalo, chickens, goats and donkeys. They stay in the main ranch house, a 14,000-square-foot adobe hacienda that the Imuses describe as an “architectural masterpiece.” The menu is vegan: no meat, fish, poultry or dairy products are served. It’s an expensive operation. The ranch hosted 90 children from March 2005 through February 2006 and spent $2.5 million – or about $28,000 a child – according to its most recent federal tax filings. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! RIBERA, N.M. – Don Imus’ banishment from the public airwaves also deprives him of a critical platform to raise money for the sprawling Imus Ranch, where children with cancer and other illnesses get a taste of the cowboy life. Before he was fired last week for calling the Rutgers University women’s basketball team “nappy-headed ho’s,” Imus pointed to the northern New Mexico ranch to make his case that he is “a good person who said a bad thing.” With Imus out of a job, some wonder whether the pipeline to charity money will eventually dry up. Just as corporate sponsors backed away from his radio show, “I think you’ll see a similar effect on the charity, where the corporate donors will find a less hot-button charity to support,” said Trent Stamp, president of Charity Navigator, a New Jersey-based charity watchdog group. last_img read more

Pankaj Tripathi on meeting manager Man Singh for 83: Got emotional listening to his life journey

first_imgActor Pankaj Tripathi, who will essay PR Man Singh in 83, said that he met the manager of the 1983 cricket World Cup’s Indian team, to prepare for the role, and was inspired by his continued passion for the sport.”It was an amazing experience meeting PR Man Singh. He has an incredible love and passion towards the game of cricket even today. He is a very disciplined person. He has created a huge museum in his house in Hyderabad with cricketing memorabilia. We spoke on various chapters of his personal and professional life, and I got emotional couple of times listening to his stories and life journey,” Pankaj said in a statement.”As an actor, I will try my sincere best to portray PR Man Singh to the best of my abilities, displaying his school of thought,” added the National Award-winning actor.The actor is currently in London to shoot 83, which stars Ranveer Singh in the lead role.The film is a real life story based on the historical win of team India in the cricket World Cup back in 1983, when the team was captained by Kapil Dev.ALSO READ | This is why Ranveer Singh stopped hugging Pankaj Tripathi on 83 setsALSO READ | 83: Pankaj Tripathi joins Ranveer Singh as manager of winning World Cup teamadvertisementALSO READ | Ranveer Singh’s 83 will now release in April 2020ALSO WATCH | Deepika Padukone marries Ranveer Singh in Italylast_img read more