All is not well at FC Reno

first_imgWestern Bureau:Following their narrow escape from relegation in the 2015-16 Red Stripe Premier League, FC Reno head coach Michael Graham fired some stinging criticism at the attitude of club officials, which he says is the reason for the former champions yearly struggle to maintain a presence in the nation’s top league.Graham told The Gleaner, after his team’s 2-1 to UWI FC on Sunday, that the plan to return to being a force in local football circles and to once again battle for the title must never begin with the coach or the players.”That conversation must begin with the club’s executive. That winning mentality must start with those at the top and filter down to the coaches and the players,” he said.Reno struggleFC Reno have been in a state of flux over the past five seasons, creating a situation where they are either relegated from the league or struggling to avoid the drop, something they have successfully managed twice in successive seasons.But for Graham and Wendell Downswell, the club’s technical director, not much will change come next season if matters having to do with the club’s well-being are not addressed in the boardroom.”How can a club survive when there are no serious plans on how to do so? This is the current state of affairs at FC Reno. If it weren’t for Mr Downswell and I, we would all be thinking about the lower leagues, if any, at the moment,” stated Graham.He said acquisition of gears boots and ball, among other needed pieces of equipment necessary for the club to carry out training and match-day necessities, are all being sourced by him and Downswell, noting that they receive no help from those who hold “positions” in the club.”Yet these are some of our fiercest critics when the team fails to win. The fact is, unless issues at the executive level are fixed, the club is doomed to failure,” Graham said.”This is a case in which it shows how a club should not be managed,” added Graham.FC Reno were the first club to win three Premier League titles, the last of which came in the 1995 season during a period of dominance. They also won titles in 1990 and again in 1991.The Westmoreland-based club are also winners of three national knockout titles, Winning the now named Flow Champions Cup in 2014. But since then, they have endured two seasons of utter chaos, resulting in near relegation.last_img read more

Holloway praises fans after QPR win

first_imgQPR’s win moved them to the 50-point mark Ian Holloway praised QPR fans after the 4-1 victory over Norwich at Loftus Road.Rangers came from behind after Ryan Manning’s freak own goal, with Massimo Luongo, Matt Smith and Ebere Eze scoring before Manning headed in the fourth.“I think it’s down to the fans,” Holloway declared.”The fans are really appreciating the way the players are working and the skill they’ve got, and that bodes well for the future.“I want to thank the fans, because the atmosphere they’re creating for these young gentlemen is something sensational.“No matter whether they get it wrong or not, they still want the ball and they (the fans) can’t wait to see them do something.#The exciting Ebere Eze impressed again for QPR © Yui Mok/PA Wire“It’s very exciting, so thanks everybody from me – you’ve made us not worry about letting a goal in.”Norwich manager Daniel Farke said his team failed to deal with QPR’s long balls to Smith, but Rangers boss Holloway insisted they are about much more.Teenage forward Eze was a threat throughout and his goal was his second for the R’s.Holloway said: “We’ve got different skill sets. Matt is as good at doing what he does as anyone in our league and in the top league.“And we’ve got Ebere and what he’s got. He’s very exciting. I want him to create goals and score for us.“I’m very pleased with him. He’s a wonderfully balanced, intelligent boy and he wants to learn.“He glides and he floats. Ebere just beats you so easily. I want to encourage him to get in there and the team to give it to him.“We’ve got belief and why wouldn’t you have that with the skill we have on the pitch? I can see us getting stronger and stronger.”Luongo’s goal was his fourth in seven games and, coming straight after Rangers went behind, proved to be a pivotal moment in the game.Holloway said: “I thought the lads showed terrific skill and mentality to score as early as we did. It was a fantastic goal – a couple of little one-twos.“I gave Mass rest the other day. We look fantastic when he’s in there in that form. He’s starting to get prolific.”See also:QPR come from behind to crush NorwichFarke: Norwich failed to deal with QPR’s long-ball tacticsTwo more QPR youngsters in line for first-team chance at HullQPR v Norwich player ratingsPalace and Brighton monitor QPR’s EzeHolloway: QPR youngster Eze still has a lot to learn Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebookby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksRecommended for youAspireAbove.comRemember Pauley Perrette? Try Not To Smile When You See Her NowAspireAbove.comUndoLifestly.com25 Celebs You Didn’t Realize Are Gay – No. 8 Will Surprise WomenLifestly.comUndoUsed Cars | Search AdsUsed Cars in Tuen Mun Might Be Cheaper Than You ThinkUsed Cars | Search AdsUndoTopCars15 Ugliest Cars Ever MadeTopCarsUndoezzin.com20 Breathtaking Places to See Before You Dieezzin.comUndoFood World Magazine15 Fruits that Burn Fat Like CrazyFood World MagazineUndoDrhealth35 Foods That Should Never Be Placed in the RefrigeratorDrhealthUndoHappyTricks.comHer House Always Smells Amazing – Try her Unique Trick!HappyTricks.comUndolast_img read more

Tall Dinosaurs Couldn’t Lift Up Their Heads

first_imgIn Jurassic Park, the huge sauropods were pictured grazing on the tops of tall trees.  This would have been physically implausible, said an Australian biologist in a letter to Science.1  A brachiosaur’s head would be 9 meters above its chest.  That would require 750 mm (Hg) of blood pressure.  The problem of circulation, not only of hypertension, would have made these beasts keep their heads down, he said.This approach to the problem does not rely on knowledge of heart size or strength, but involves an estimate of the energy cost of the circulation, based on two axiomatic relationships between metabolic rate, blood flow rate, and blood pressure.  First, the Fick Principle states that an animal’s aerobic metabolic rate is proportional to blood flow rate.  Second, the rate of work done by the left ventricle is proportional to the product of blood flow rate and mean arterial blood pressure.  Therefore, cardiac work is proportional to the product of metabolic rate and blood pressure.  Cardiac work averages about 10% of the metabolic rate in mammals that have a mean arterial blood pressure of about 100 mm Hg.  An animal that produces 750 mm Hg would consequently have a cardiac work rate 7.5 times higher.  Its metabolic rate would increase to 165%, and it would expend 45% of its total energy requirements just to circulate the blood.  These percentages would be the same whether the animals were active or resting, high-energy endotherms or low-energy ectotherms.  The high cost of high browsing makes it energetically more reasonable to keep the head down and move the neck horizontally rather than vertically.Even so, the hearts of these creatures must have been enormous.1.  Roger S. Seymour, “Sauropods Kept Their Heads Down,” Science, 27 March 2009: Vol. 323. no. 5922, pp. 1671-1672, DOI: 10.1126/science.323.5922.1671.Creationists have long pointed to the design features of living giraffes that enable them to lift their heads high to browse in the tall trees, yet bend over and drink water without passing out (see, for instance, Robert Kofahl’s article from Creation Magazine, and the film Incredible Creatures That Defy Evolution).  The engineering problems solved by the Creator in the giraffe are simple compared to those of the brachiosaurus.  We think, despite Seymour’s concern, that God’s engineering expertise is adequate for the task.(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more