Wolmer’s, Mona on top

first_imgWolmer’s and Mona Preparatory schools captured the boys’ and girls’ titles, respectively, in the preparatory and primary section of the 18th annual Mayberry Investments Schools Swimming Championships held at the National Aquatic Centre last Saturday.Wolmer’s Boys amassed 232.50 points to finish ahead of Sts Peter and Paul Prep – 148. Third went to Mona, 138, while St Hugh’s Prep, 121, and Stella Maris, 118, rounded out the top five.In the girls’ section, Mona Prep scored 151 points and they were followed by Stella Maris, 133, Sts Peter and Paul, 130, Wolmer’s, 116 and St Hugh’s 109.A whopping 38 individual records were broken on Saturday, including what could be considered a standout performance from 10-year-old Zaneta Alvaranga of St Hugh’s Prep.She smashed a record per event, copping four individual records. She won the 50m backstroke girls 9-10 in 35:19 seconds; the 50m freestyle in 29:23; the girls 12 and under 100m freestyle in 1:07.08; and the 50m butterfly for girls 9-10 in 31.97.She also anchored her school to a new 200m freestyle relay record of 2 minutes 33:71 seconds for girls 9-10.Alvaranga picked up the high point trophy for the girls 9-10 age group with 36 points.Other high-point trophy winners were Stella Maris’ Jonathan Haynes and Nia-Kai Campbell of Mount Alvernia in the six and under age group; Kajaun Haughton of Wolmer’s Prep and Christanya Shirley, also of Wolmer’s Prep, in the 7-8 age group; Sts Peter and Paul’s Joshua Alleyne and Paig’e Lewis in the 11-12 age group.The three-day Tornadoes Swim meet will take place at the same venue, starting on Friday.last_img read more

Upbeat Theophane eyes Mexican mission

first_imgAshley Theophane features on the undercard of Ricky Hatton’s return to the ring later this month – after which his next port of call could be Mexico.The Kilburn man will face Chris Truman at the Manchester Arena on November 24, when former world champion Hatton, who is coming out of retirement, takes on Vyacheslav Senchenko.Theophane was expected to meet Venezuela’s Johan Perez, ranked number six by the World Boxing Association, but the deal fell through.The clash with Truman, from Birmingham, will be Theophane’s first fight in the UK since a surprise defeat against Darren Hamilton saw him lose the British light-welterweight title in May.He bounced back with a victory in the United States, where he has been based for much of his career.A showdown with Perez could still happen in the future, while there has also been talk of a fight against Senchenko – himself an ex-world champion.And Lenny Daws, the man he beat to win the British title, recently won the European crown, possibly paving the way for a rematch.But Theophane, who has also boxed in Germany and St Lucia, plans to carry on globe-trotting in 2013, with Mexico a possible destination.He told West London Sport: “Daws now has the EBU belt, so maybe that could happen. I’ve fought on shows by Mick Hennessy, his promoter, in the past.“But to be honest, there aren’t too many fighters in Britain I’d be looking at. I’m more interested in fighting on the international stage.“There was Perez, and maybe that fight could be made. Plus I’ve been speaking to a promoter in Mexico and there could be a chance to fight there.“Then you’ve got Senchenko. If Ricky wins that fight, which I expect him to, then a fight could be made there too.“I’ve fought around the world and have shown I’m willing to travel, and that’s still the case.”Theophane must first dispose of Truman, who lost to Daws on points earlier this year but produced a performance which suggested he should not be taken lightly.“I’ve don’t know that much about him but he lost a decision to Daws and many ringside observers felt he won that,” Theophane said.“That tells you he’s a decent fighter and I’m going to have to be 100% on my game to beat him, which I will be.“I’m looking to get the victory and then push on in 2013. If I can get a knockout then great, but the main thing is getting that victory.” 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Conte on Vidal, Rodriguez, Spurs, Costa, Alonso and more

first_imgChelsea boss Antonio Conte was asked about a number of issues at his press conference ahead of his side’s game against Tottenham. Here is some of what the Italian had to say. Conte on his hopes for the transfer window“For sure there are some positions where, if we are able to find the right solution, it’s important to take that right solution.“But also I know the market is difficult. Finding the right player won’t be easy, but we are talking about it.”“I answer always in the same way. I don’t like to speak about players that are now playing with other teams. This is respect for players and also for the clubs.”On reports Chelsea want Ricardo Rodriguez and Arturo Vidal“I answer always in the same way. I don’t like to speak about players that are now playing with other teams. This is respect for players and also for the clubs.”On Marcos Alonso, who picked up a knockEmbed from Getty Images“He is available for tomorrow’s game and we do not have any injuries.”On his many attacking options“I like to have these type of problems. I like to have my players in good form and then to make the best choice for the game.“We have Pedro, Willian, Hazard and Costa and they are in good form – good shape.“I have to decide the starting 11 but I think you win the game in 95 minutes and it’s important to have all the players available and everyone playing well.”On facing Tottenham“To win 13 games in a row in this league is not easy – it’s very difficult. We are pleased about this and tomorrow we know we have a really tough game against Tottenham, which is a very strong team.“For this reason it’s very important to pay great attention and to try to continue our run. For sure it will be very tough. For me Tottenham are better than last season.”On Spurs boss Mauricio Pochettino suggesting that neutrals want his team to beat ChelseaEmbed from Getty Images“I think every team wants to stop our run, not only Tottenham. But it you see the table you will see that we are only five points clear. The league is open and we are only just in the second half of the season.”On visiting White Hart Lane“I never played there. I watched a Europa League game against Fiorentina. The atmosphere was very good.” On Diego Costa admitting he wanted to leave in the summer“Diego told me: ‘I stay and I want to fight for this club – I want to fight for my team-mates and for this shirt’. I wasn’t concerned.“He has been showing great passion in the right way and we are happy about this – the club and his team-mates. He is focused on his game and that’s very important.”On adapting to life in England“When you change country and it’s new habits and a new language, you have to bring your philosophy. It’s not easy. It’s important to take time to work with your players.“If you think that you want to change everything, then you make a mistake. It’s important to concentrate on the most important things and then to try to change something and bring your methods.”On the future of John Mikel Obi“For now we haven’t any news.” See also:Tottenham v Chelsea: five key battles  Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

How Not to Prove Positive Selection

first_imgErase all that evidence for positive natural selection in the genes you’ve read about.  It’s all misleading confusion based on “certain poorly conceived statistical methods,” argues Austin L. Hughes, an evolutionary biologist at the University of South Carolina.  Writing a commentary in PNAS,1 he accused, “Thousands of papers are published every year claiming evidence of adaptive evolution on the basis of computational analyses alone, with no evidence whatsoever regarding the phenotypic effects of allegedly adaptive mutations.”    Why would Hughes make such a damning statement among colleagues of the National Academy of Sciences, who are overwhelmingly pro-evolution?  The reason: he wanted to praise a new study that does it right.  In the same issue of PNAS,2 a study by Yokoyama is “solidly grounded in biology,” Hughes said.  Instead of presenting “more of the same” evidence of positive selection without tying it to adaptation at the phenotypical level, this paper related changes in visual pigment genes to actual benefits for the organism.    More on that later.  What’s interesting about evolutionary claims in perspective is that Hughes presented this paper as if it were a rarity, a first step in the right direction after decades of error.  “Sequences of DNA provide documentary evidence of the evolutionary past undreamed of by pioneers such as Darwin and Wallace, but their potential as sources of evolutionary information is still far from being realized,” he began.  “A major hindrance to progress has been confusion regarding the role of positive (Darwinian) selection, i.e., natural selection favoring adaptive mutations.”  That’s when he criticized the methods in “thousands of papers” that rely on “certain poorly conceived statistical methods” that fail to show how the genetic changes relate to adaptive benefits to the organism in its ecological niche.    Hughes described how the typical paper uses an “unwarranted generalization” from one classic case in which relative frequencies of synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations3 seemed to be related to selectional pressure.  Since then, evolutionists have recklessly applied instances of dN > dS as evidence of positive selection.  This assumption is “demonstrably false,” Hughes argued, because due to the stochastic nature of mutations, such inequalities are just as likely to occur by chance, without any adaptive value.  “Yet, despite their shaky foundations, numerous publications have used these methods as the basis for claims of positive selection at the molecular level.”  In fact, using the Yokoyama et al paper to test the codon-based methods and Bayesian methods so often used in the literature, Hughes found them to be “100% off-target.”  The mutations putatively showing positive selection, in other words, bore no relation to the ones Yokoyama et al found to be adaptive.  “These results support the theoretical prediction that, because of the faulty logic in their underlying assumptions, codon-based focus mainly on statistical artifacts rather than true cases of positive selection.”  Has he just falsified “thousands of papers … published each year”?    Hughes is not done with his bombshell barrage yet.  Next, he criticized Neo-Darwinism itself – at least some widely-held assumptions about its record in the genes:Contrary to a widespread impression, natural selection does not leave any unambiguous “signature” on the genome, certainly not one that is still detectable after tens or hundreds of millions of years.  To biologists schooled in Neo-Darwinian thought processes, it is virtually axiomatic that any adaptive change must have been fixed as a result of natural selection.  But it is important to remember that reality can be more complicated than simplistic textbook scenarios.Adaptive change can occur by simple genetic drift, for instance.  Hughes suggests that some of the genomic changes for visual pigments occurred by this method.  But then, how is an evolutionary biologist to find genetic evidence for positive selection at all?  Hughes is merciless in his conclusion:In recent years the literature of evolutionary biology has been glutted with extravagant claims of positive selection on the basis of computational analyses alone, including both codon-based methods and other questionable methods such as the McDonald-Kreitman test.  This vast outpouring of pseudo-Darwinian hype has been genuinely harmful to the credibility of evolutionary biology as a science.  It is to be hoped that the work of Yokoyama et al. will help put an end to these distressing tendencies.  By incorporating experimental evidence regarding the phenotypic effects of reconstructed evolutionary changes, this study sets a new standard for studies of adaptive evolution at the molecular level.  In addition, by providing evidence that non-Darwinian and Darwinian processes are likely to be involved in the evolution of adaptive phenotypes, it points the way toward a new, more realistic appreciation of the evolutionary process.Since Hughes put such a high value on the paper by Yokoyama et al,2 treating it as if it were the guiding light among thousands of papers lacking credibility, it bears taking a closer look.  The authors started immediately with assumptions based on evolution that they admitted are difficult to prove:Vertebrate ancestors appeared in a uniform, shallow water environment, but modern species flourish in highly variable niches.  A striking array of phenotypes exhibited by contemporary animals is assumed to have evolved by accumulating a series of selectively advantageous mutations.  However, the experimental test of such adaptive events at the molecular level is remarkably difficult.The authors referred to the evolution of visual pigments as “the deepest body of knowledge linking differences in specific genes to differences in ecology and to the evolution of species.”  This makes their subject matter the best case available for testing evolution with molecular methods.  They extracted rhodopsins from 5 deep-sea fish and compared them to 35 types of animals.  As Hughes had indicated, they showed that the standard codon-based, statistical inferences to positive selection are misleading.  This was a major emphasis in their paper.  In fact, four of their five major conclusions related to how traditional methods of assessing positive selection can be misleading.    Then, using mutagenesis experiments, they purported to show that adaptive sensitivity to particular wavelengths of light in specific environments “evolved on at least 18 separate occasions.  These highly environment-specific adaptations seem to have occurred largely by amino acid replacements at 12 sites, and most of those at the remaining 191 (~94%) sites have undergone neutral evolution.”  In other words, evidence for genetic drift (neutral changes) swamped evidence for positive selection by 94%.  But even then, they started by assuming that the “ancestral” rhodopsin, which they “engineered” using evolutionary assumptions and mutagenesis, started with a maximal sensitivity to 500 nm light.    Clearly, Cambrian-age ancestral rhodopsin is not available for study.  The ancestral rhodopsin on which their conclusions depend, therefore, was manufactured by them in the lab, based on their assumptions of evolutionary ancestry, millions of years, and the positions of animals in a phylogenetic tree, assuming the rhodopsins had diversified by natural selection.  The reasoning seems circular.  Even so, genetic drift was far more evident than positive selection.  And, to fit the data, they had to conclude that genotypes appeared and reappeared multiple times without any particular trend.  They said, “To complicate the matter further, evolutionary changes are not always unidirectional and ancestral phenotypes may reappear during evolution.”    Since no clear evolutionary pattern became evident without evolutionary assumptions,4 therefore, it is difficult to see how this paper could be judged any more objective than the thousands of papers Hughes criticized.1.  Austin L. Hughes, “The origin of adaptive phenotypes,” (Commentary, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published September 3, 2008, doi:10.1073/pnas.0807440105.2.  Yokoyama, Tada, Zhang and Britt, “Elucidation of phenotypic adaptations: Molecular analyses of dim-light vision proteins in vertebrates,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published September 3, 2008, doi:10.1073/pnas.0802426105.3.  Nonsynonymous mutations in a gene change the amino acid in the resulting protein.  Synonymous mutations do not, because some some of the 64 possible DNA codons have “synonyms” that code for the same amino acid (there are only 20 amino acids in most proteins).4.  E.g, notice the evolutionary assumptions in this excerpt from the paper: “The ancestors of bony fish most likely used rhodopsins with [lambdamax-s (maximum sensitivity wavelength)] of ~500 nm (Fig. 1).  What types of light environment did these ancestors have?  The origin of many early vertebrate ancestors is controversial [i.e., the Cambrian explosion], but that of bony fish ancestors is clear [referring to a 1988 text on Vertebrate Paleontology and Evolution].  The fossil records from late Cambrian and early Ordovician, ~500 Mya, show that the ancestors of bony fish lived in shallow, near-shore marine environments (30�32).  Therefore, pigment a must have functioned as a surface rhodopsin and its lambda-max would be consistent with that role.  Interpolating from the ancestral and contemporary rhodopsins, it is most likely that pigments b�d and f�h (lambdamax ~ 501�502 nm) were also surface rhodopsins, pigment i (496 nm) was an intermediate rhodopsin, and pigments e, j, and k (480�485 nm) were deep-sea rhodopsins (Fig. 1).  From their predicted lambdamax-s, it is also likely that pigments q, r, s, and v were intermediate rhodospins [sic] and pigment u was a deep-sea rhodopsin (Fig. 1)…. Based on the four types of dim-light vision, vertebrates show six different evolutionary paths (Fig. 1)….”  Later, they gave a Lamarckian description: “When moving into new dim-light environments, vertebrate ancestors adjusted their dim-light vision by modifying their rhodopsins.”Wow.  The damage to evolutionist credibility from these two papers can hardly be overstated.  Hughes just wiped away stacks and stacks of papers that Ken Miller and Eugenie Scott might have piled up in a courtroom to demonstrate the overwhelming evidence for evolution, then he held up a very weak paper as the best example yet.  We looked into that paper and found nothing but evolutionary assumptions buttressing evolutionary assumptions.    Consider how weak their best evidence is.  They were talking about animals that already had eyes, retinas, optic nerves, brains and all the other organs and functions that support vision.  The only parameter that they studied was the wavelengths of light to which particular rhodopsin molecules are maximally sensitive, between 482 and 505 billionths of a meter.  But as we know from many phenomena in biology, compensating mechanisms are often at work.  It would be impossible to prove that a fish with a rhodopsin most sensitive to 489 nm would be any better evolved than one with a rhodopsin most sensitive to 502 nm, because the ganglion cells or optic nerve might compensate for the slight shift in sensitivity.  All we observe is that living fishes today are marvelously adapted to their particular ecological niches.    We’re only talking about virtually indistinguishable shades of green light, folks!  Are you impressed with the creative power of natural selection?  Are you impressed with scientists’ ability to demonstrate evolution at the molecular level?  During the hundreds of millions of years in which animals supposedly evolved from trilobites to philosophers, the best evolutionists can show are slight changes to sensitivity to green light in just 12 positions in one protein molecule out of the thousands of exquisitely-adapted enzymes essential for vision.  Even then, the “evolution” demonstrated is predominantly from mutational drift, with no particular functional trend, and the changes (we are told) appeared, disappeared, and reappeared 18 times.  At the most optimistic, the changes they’re talking about are microevolutionary.  Even staunch young-earth creationists would have no difficulty believing that changes this small might occur in a few thousand years.    Nothing the evolutionists have produced as evidence for natural selection (after the purge of papers by Hughes) is sufficient to distinguish between creation vs evolution models.  Should evolution be the only view sanctified in the schools?  Hughes was right on when he said that the “vast outpouring of pseudo-Darwinian hype has been genuinely harmful to the credibility of evolutionary biology as a science.”  He did nothing to repair the damage, and by pointing to an insipid paper as the best example yet after decades of hype, he actually made it worse.    This effectively undermines everything the evolutionists have told us about divining evolutionary history in the genes (e.g., 06/13/2003, 04/30/2005).  Where else could we see it?  In the fossil record?  Ha! (07/21/2003), 05/21/2004, 05/10/2008).    Undoubtedly the Darwin Party will spin this situation in their favor, by making it an illustration of the progress of triumphalist materialist secularist science.  For 8 years now, CEH has been exposing the charades behind the curtain where Charles the Extravagant, the Wizard of Flaws, and his loyal munchkins dupe people into thinking that evidence for evolution is overwhelming.  This is a prime example.  Now you know.  Get the word out!  Expose the charlatan!  We need to get out of this mythical fantasyland (09/04/2008) and back to the real world!  The Kansas School Board is counting on you!You’re off to shame the Wizard, the Blunderful Wizard of FlawsYou’ll find he is a Wimp of a Wiz if ever a Wiz there wasIf ever, oh ever, a Wimp there was the Wizard of Flaws is one becauseBecause, because, because, because, becauseBecause of the blunderful spins he doesYou’re off to shame the wizard, the Blunderful Wizard of Flaws.Use your brain.  Take courage.  Have a heart.  And bark, Toto, bark!(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Completing the farm balance sheet

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest It is never too late to complete your farm’s balance sheet. The balance sheet is a “snap shot” in time of your farm’s financial position, including what assets you own and how they are financed. The balance sheet is also known as the net worth statement. When completed accurately and in a timely manner, the balance sheet and corresponding ratios are very valuable tools to evaluate farm financial health. The balance sheet objectively measures farm business growth, liquidity, solvency, and risk-bearing capacity. Categorizing balance sheet itemsThe assets and liabilities on the balance sheet (including the financing of the assets) are used to determine the equity, or net worth, of the farm owner. The owner’s equity is used by lenders and insurers to determine the value of a farm business. Calculation of owner’s equity, or net worth is simple. Simply subtract the total liabilities from the total assets: assets – liabilities = owner’s equity Terms of assets and liabilitiesBeyond the broad categories of assets or liabilities, a balance sheet categorizes items into “time compartments” or terms of useful life. Useful life is a term for the amount of time an item can be utilized for the farm business. Depreciation allocates the cost of this asset over its useful life. Both assets and liabilities can be categorized into current, intermediate, and long, or fixed, terms of useful life. AssetsCurrent assets can be converted to cash in one year or less. Common current assets are cash, growing crops, harvested crop inventory, market livestock, accounts receivable, and other similar items. Intermediate assets have an assumed useful life or depreciable value of one to ten years. Common intermediate assets are breeding livestock, machinery and equipment, titled vehicles, and not-readily-marketable bonds and securities. Long term, or fixed, assets are typically permanent items with value — depreciable or not — for more than 10 years and include farmland, buildings, farmsteads, and other similar items. LiabilitiesCurrent liabilities are obligations that are due and payable in the next twelve months. Most common current liabilities include accounts payable (bills), credit card bills, operating lines of credit, accrued interest, and the current portion of principal on loans due in the coming year. Intermediate liabilities are obligations that are due to be paid back within two to 10 years and are usually associated with intermediate farm assets on the left side of the balance sheet. Common intermediate liabilities are the principal remaining on machinery and equipment loans or breeding livestock purchases. Finally, long term, or fixed, liabilities are debts with terms greater than 10 years like the principal balance remaining on a farmland or building mortgage. Assets: market value vs. cost valueToday’s market values minus selling costs are used to determine market value. For example, a fully depreciated 15-year-old tractor certainly has a current market value greater than zero. A realistic current market value for this tractor can be obtained with an appraisal, or by looking at current sales of similar tractors online. Similarly, farmland bought 30 years ago likely has a different current market value today. In general, lenders prefer the use of current market values in a balance sheet for asset valuation. Cost valueThe net book value, or the cost of the item minus accumulated depreciation, is the cost value. For example, a fully depreciated 15-year-old tractor may have a cost value of $0 in a cost-based balance sheet. No appraisal is needed; only record the cost minus accumulated depreciation. Farmland (a non-depreciable, long term asset) purchased 30 years ago has a balance sheet value of the purchase cost. In general, accountants prefer cost value balance sheets as a more clear reflection of business success, based on business decisions rather than inflation, depreciation, or appreciation of investments.In an accurately completed balance sheet, the cost value and the market value columns usually produce different total asset values. Keys to completing the balance sheetSeveral keys can help farmer improve their accuracy, effectiveness, and efficiency when completing year-end balance sheets.Complete the balance sheet on the same date each year, usually as of Dec. 31. The information will never be more accurate than immediately after the end of the year.Inventory all assets, including standard weight and measure units (ie. pounds, head, bushels, bales, etc).Utilize current market prices for crop and livestock inventories.Calculate cost value for growing crops such as wheat, new hay seedings or cover crops.Include government payments and insurance indemnities yet to be received in accounts receivable.Apply conservative breeding livestock values, avoiding large year-to-year changes.Maintain a separate, easy-to-update depreciation schedule for depreciable assets. Balance Sheet ToolsBalance sheet ratios can be used to evaluate financial health. A balance sheet is an accounting statement needed by a farmer to evaluate his or her financial health. An income statement and a statement of cashflows are also needed to provide the entire financial picture. These three statements can be used with the Farm Finance Scorecard available from the University of Minnesota’s Center for Farm Financial Health at https://www.cffm.umn.edu/Publications/pubs/FarmMgtTopics/FarmFinanceScorecard.pdf.The scorecard uses these three accounting statements to determine financial ratios and measurements to benchmark a farm operation against acceptable industry standards.An annual comparison of the same farm, referred to as a vertical analysis, can be used to evaluate the health of a balance sheet. With vertical analysis, one year’s balance sheet totals can be added to a spreadsheet with entries from previous years for comparison. Additionally, the spreadsheet would be used for upcoming years to continue the vertical analysis. This analysis does not benchmark a farm against the industry but, instead, shows the growth achieved and trends developed by the farm over time. This analysis is one of the features provided for farms that participate in the Ohio Farm Business Analysis and Benchmarking Program.Contact Dianne Shoemaker at shoemaker.3@osu.edu for more information about this program.last_img read more

Enterprise Startup Spotlight: Revolution Analytics, Taking on SAS, SPSS

first_imgIT + Project Management: A Love Affair Revolution Analytics is a company that provides commercial support for the open source statistical programming language R. Its flagship product is Revolution R for Enterprise, a distribution of R that competes with other commercial statistical products such as SAS and SPSS. Revolution CEO Norman H. Nie was the co-inventor of SPSS.R was created in 1993 by by Ross Ihaka and Robert Gentleman at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. It’s actually an implementation of S, a programming language that was inspired by the LISP dialect Scheme.Revolution was founded in 2007 by academics at Yale. The founders weren’t actively involved in the development of R says COO Jeff Erhardt, but since Nie joined Revolution in 2009 the company has been actively contributing back to the main R project. Also, Gentleman now sits on Revolution’s board.Although R includes a graphical user interface (GUI), Revolution provides its own a Web-based GUI. Both R and R for Enterprise are available for Windows, Linux and OSX. Revolution offers R for Enterprise to academics for free. Revolution recently added the ability to natively import SAS data sets. It also announced its SAS to R challenge. Revolution will convert SAS code into R for free for qualified participants.Revolution has several big name enterprise customers, including Bank of America and Pfizer. But one of the more interesting customers is CARDIODX, a genomic diagnostics company focused on – you guessed it – cardiology. CARDIODX uses R for Enterprise to process gigabytes of genomic data in order to predict the likelihood you’ll come down with a cardiovascular disease.R and Revolution are also being used by consultants to provide data analysis as a service, something that licensing agreements on competing products prohibits says Erhardt. According to Crunchbase, Revolution has received $17.6 million in funding from Intel Capital and North Bridge Venture Partners. Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… klint finley Tags:#enterprise#Products center_img Related Posts 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo…last_img read more

Mayweather warns of hefty fine if McGregor kicks him in their fight

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Man sworn in as lawyer by judge who sentenced him to prison as a teen 20 years ago Mayweather unfazed by ‘dirty’ McGregor Mayweather unfazed by ‘dirty’ McGregor LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Aside from the probability of receiving a high kick, Kimmel also asked the 40-year-old boxing icon about the possibility of a second fight, this time inside the Octagon under MMA rules.“As of right now, we gotta get past August 26,” Mayweather said. “Once we get past August 26, then we can talk about other things.”A clip of Mayweather’s full interview is available below.  /raRELATED STORY:ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Manny Pacquiao on Floyd Mayweather: Let him enjoy retirement PLAY LIST 00:44Manny Pacquiao on Floyd Mayweather: Let him enjoy retirement01:49Pacquiao to Mayweather: Want fans to stop asking for rematch? Then fight me again01:16Pacquiao takes another swipe at Mayweather over exhibition match KO01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games MOST READ Flags of SEA Games countries raised at Athletes Village Read Next In a recent appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live, Mayweather was asked what would happen if his opponent decides to throw a kick or any other MMA technique during their 12-round boxing showdown on Aug. 26.“That’s a fine, that’s a huge fine,” he told host Jimmy Kimmel.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“I don’t think he’d want to lose, probably 90 percent of his money or even more. I don’t know what it’s gonna be, but it’s gonna be a heavy fine,” he added.Although it remains highly unlikely that McGregor would throw such a blatant illegal strike, the brash Irishman is known to be as unpredictable as it comes. UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief It’s just over a week away from one of the most anticipated bouts in boxing, as undefeated fighter Floyd Mayweather Jr. returns to the ring to face off UFC lightweight champion Conor McGregor.The former is known to be the ultimate boxing tactician, while the latter is a complete mixed martial artist, adept in using both his arms and legs in combat.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

Inbound Marketing Sponsors Disney World!

first_img What do you think? Originally published Dec 15, 2008 1:17:00 AM, updated March 21 2013 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: This is an absolutely brilliant marketing idea.  It’s one of those things you’ll wish you had thought of.  Watch the video and you’ll know what I mean.  If the video doesn’t play for you, it’s because the viral marketing campaign was so successful, the servers couldn’t keep up. last_img

Demand Generation vs. Inbound Marketing – Is There a Difference?

first_img Inbound Marketing is More Marketing Centric: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack What Does it Mean for You? Inbound Marketing Live Webinar: The State of Inbound Marketing Lead Generation ———- Have you ever wondered what the difference is between demand generation and data we can see that inbound marketing budgets are increasing Is There Really a Difference? inbound marketing Demand Generation is More Sales Centric: This is what I like to call a holy grail question – every organization will be starting from a different level of skill, attitude, and belief set so the mix will vary greatly from company to company. If we look at the Let’s call demand generation what it really is….. it’s really just a new approach to driving revenue with traditional outbound marketing approaches. There are some cool technologies that are improving on the last 50 years worth of demand generation best practices, but there is nothing really and truly paradigm shifting. It is the same type of outbound marketing practices that prospects are getting more adept at shutting out – think unwanted cold calls (these days called warm calls), email blasts, list buying, TV commercials, sponsored webinars and the like. The demand generation approach is really gravitated to by companies with sales driven cultures that place an emphasis on the cold call. and traditional outbound marketing budgets are declining. The marketing mix is shifting to inbound marketing and expect this trend to accelerate in the years ahead. Learn how companies are using inbound marketing techniques to generate higher volume and lower cost leads and customers. The big idea is that for the vast majority of companies a budget focused on inbound marketing instead of traditional outbound marketing will be more than enough to improve revenue, bottom line profitability and make your job much easier. Photo Credit: Download the On-Demand Webinar Now! @chadalevitt Chad Levitt is an Inbound Marketing Specialist with HubSpot and author of the New Sales Economy blog that focuses on how sales 2.0, social media, and how inbound marketing can be used as a . Originally published Jun 17, 2010 7:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 sales strategy Inbound Marketing is paradigm shifting and the strategies used to implement inbound marketing have been around for less than ten years. The real shift has only occurred in the past five years as blogging, true opt-in email, social media, and SEO have grown in popularity. Inbound marketing is all about creating content and viewing yourself, company, etc. as a publisher of content, that when combined with other inbound marketing best practices,  can generate quality inbound leads for your business, inside and outside sales teams. Inbound marketing leads are also less expensive than traditional outbound marketing approaches to demand generation. This approach is adopted by forward thinking companies that place an emphasis on being where the marketplace is moving. What is the Right Mix of Demand Generation and Inbound Marketing? ? What does each phrase mean for marketing and sales? Which approach should your company focus on? Is one more relevant or important than the other? If you find yourself scratching your head trying to hammer out the differences between demand generation and inbound marketing so you can execute, well, this post is for you. Garrett Albright are pretty similar at first blush, but don’t be fooled. Demand Generation and Inbound Marketing are very different. Topics: Demand Generation and Inbound Marketing for the Web 2.0 world. You can connect with Chad on Twitterlast_img read more