Conte on Vidal, Rodriguez, Spurs, Costa, Alonso and more

first_imgChelsea boss Antonio Conte was asked about a number of issues at his press conference ahead of his side’s game against Tottenham. Here is some of what the Italian had to say. Conte on his hopes for the transfer window“For sure there are some positions where, if we are able to find the right solution, it’s important to take that right solution.“But also I know the market is difficult. Finding the right player won’t be easy, but we are talking about it.”“I answer always in the same way. I don’t like to speak about players that are now playing with other teams. This is respect for players and also for the clubs.”On reports Chelsea want Ricardo Rodriguez and Arturo Vidal“I answer always in the same way. I don’t like to speak about players that are now playing with other teams. This is respect for players and also for the clubs.”On Marcos Alonso, who picked up a knockEmbed from Getty Images“He is available for tomorrow’s game and we do not have any injuries.”On his many attacking options“I like to have these type of problems. I like to have my players in good form and then to make the best choice for the game.“We have Pedro, Willian, Hazard and Costa and they are in good form – good shape.“I have to decide the starting 11 but I think you win the game in 95 minutes and it’s important to have all the players available and everyone playing well.”On facing Tottenham“To win 13 games in a row in this league is not easy – it’s very difficult. We are pleased about this and tomorrow we know we have a really tough game against Tottenham, which is a very strong team.“For this reason it’s very important to pay great attention and to try to continue our run. For sure it will be very tough. For me Tottenham are better than last season.”On Spurs boss Mauricio Pochettino suggesting that neutrals want his team to beat ChelseaEmbed from Getty Images“I think every team wants to stop our run, not only Tottenham. But it you see the table you will see that we are only five points clear. The league is open and we are only just in the second half of the season.”On visiting White Hart Lane“I never played there. I watched a Europa League game against Fiorentina. The atmosphere was very good.” On Diego Costa admitting he wanted to leave in the summer“Diego told me: ‘I stay and I want to fight for this club – I want to fight for my team-mates and for this shirt’. I wasn’t concerned.“He has been showing great passion in the right way and we are happy about this – the club and his team-mates. He is focused on his game and that’s very important.”On adapting to life in England“When you change country and it’s new habits and a new language, you have to bring your philosophy. It’s not easy. It’s important to take time to work with your players.“If you think that you want to change everything, then you make a mistake. It’s important to concentrate on the most important things and then to try to change something and bring your methods.”On the future of John Mikel Obi“For now we haven’t any news.” See also:Tottenham v Chelsea: five key battles  Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Sources: 49ers Garoppolo may be ready to work out sooner than expected

first_imgJimmy Garoppolo’s surgery to repair a torn ACL in his left knee went so well that it is anticipated he could ready for training camp, sources told ESPN.The 49ers reported that doctors found just a torn ACL and no other major damage during surgery last week. Garoppolo’s recovery time is expected to be six to eight weeks, ESPN said.Meanwhile, 49ers head coach Kyle Shanahan, speaking with reporters, broached the possibility that Garoppolo could be working out sooner than that.“I haven’t gotten …last_img

How Not to Prove Positive Selection

first_imgErase all that evidence for positive natural selection in the genes you’ve read about.  It’s all misleading confusion based on “certain poorly conceived statistical methods,” argues Austin L. Hughes, an evolutionary biologist at the University of South Carolina.  Writing a commentary in PNAS,1 he accused, “Thousands of papers are published every year claiming evidence of adaptive evolution on the basis of computational analyses alone, with no evidence whatsoever regarding the phenotypic effects of allegedly adaptive mutations.”    Why would Hughes make such a damning statement among colleagues of the National Academy of Sciences, who are overwhelmingly pro-evolution?  The reason: he wanted to praise a new study that does it right.  In the same issue of PNAS,2 a study by Yokoyama is “solidly grounded in biology,” Hughes said.  Instead of presenting “more of the same” evidence of positive selection without tying it to adaptation at the phenotypical level, this paper related changes in visual pigment genes to actual benefits for the organism.    More on that later.  What’s interesting about evolutionary claims in perspective is that Hughes presented this paper as if it were a rarity, a first step in the right direction after decades of error.  “Sequences of DNA provide documentary evidence of the evolutionary past undreamed of by pioneers such as Darwin and Wallace, but their potential as sources of evolutionary information is still far from being realized,” he began.  “A major hindrance to progress has been confusion regarding the role of positive (Darwinian) selection, i.e., natural selection favoring adaptive mutations.”  That’s when he criticized the methods in “thousands of papers” that rely on “certain poorly conceived statistical methods” that fail to show how the genetic changes relate to adaptive benefits to the organism in its ecological niche.    Hughes described how the typical paper uses an “unwarranted generalization” from one classic case in which relative frequencies of synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations3 seemed to be related to selectional pressure.  Since then, evolutionists have recklessly applied instances of dN > dS as evidence of positive selection.  This assumption is “demonstrably false,” Hughes argued, because due to the stochastic nature of mutations, such inequalities are just as likely to occur by chance, without any adaptive value.  “Yet, despite their shaky foundations, numerous publications have used these methods as the basis for claims of positive selection at the molecular level.”  In fact, using the Yokoyama et al paper to test the codon-based methods and Bayesian methods so often used in the literature, Hughes found them to be “100% off-target.”  The mutations putatively showing positive selection, in other words, bore no relation to the ones Yokoyama et al found to be adaptive.  “These results support the theoretical prediction that, because of the faulty logic in their underlying assumptions, codon-based focus mainly on statistical artifacts rather than true cases of positive selection.”  Has he just falsified “thousands of papers … published each year”?    Hughes is not done with his bombshell barrage yet.  Next, he criticized Neo-Darwinism itself – at least some widely-held assumptions about its record in the genes:Contrary to a widespread impression, natural selection does not leave any unambiguous “signature” on the genome, certainly not one that is still detectable after tens or hundreds of millions of years.  To biologists schooled in Neo-Darwinian thought processes, it is virtually axiomatic that any adaptive change must have been fixed as a result of natural selection.  But it is important to remember that reality can be more complicated than simplistic textbook scenarios.Adaptive change can occur by simple genetic drift, for instance.  Hughes suggests that some of the genomic changes for visual pigments occurred by this method.  But then, how is an evolutionary biologist to find genetic evidence for positive selection at all?  Hughes is merciless in his conclusion:In recent years the literature of evolutionary biology has been glutted with extravagant claims of positive selection on the basis of computational analyses alone, including both codon-based methods and other questionable methods such as the McDonald-Kreitman test.  This vast outpouring of pseudo-Darwinian hype has been genuinely harmful to the credibility of evolutionary biology as a science.  It is to be hoped that the work of Yokoyama et al. will help put an end to these distressing tendencies.  By incorporating experimental evidence regarding the phenotypic effects of reconstructed evolutionary changes, this study sets a new standard for studies of adaptive evolution at the molecular level.  In addition, by providing evidence that non-Darwinian and Darwinian processes are likely to be involved in the evolution of adaptive phenotypes, it points the way toward a new, more realistic appreciation of the evolutionary process.Since Hughes put such a high value on the paper by Yokoyama et al,2 treating it as if it were the guiding light among thousands of papers lacking credibility, it bears taking a closer look.  The authors started immediately with assumptions based on evolution that they admitted are difficult to prove:Vertebrate ancestors appeared in a uniform, shallow water environment, but modern species flourish in highly variable niches.  A striking array of phenotypes exhibited by contemporary animals is assumed to have evolved by accumulating a series of selectively advantageous mutations.  However, the experimental test of such adaptive events at the molecular level is remarkably difficult.The authors referred to the evolution of visual pigments as “the deepest body of knowledge linking differences in specific genes to differences in ecology and to the evolution of species.”  This makes their subject matter the best case available for testing evolution with molecular methods.  They extracted rhodopsins from 5 deep-sea fish and compared them to 35 types of animals.  As Hughes had indicated, they showed that the standard codon-based, statistical inferences to positive selection are misleading.  This was a major emphasis in their paper.  In fact, four of their five major conclusions related to how traditional methods of assessing positive selection can be misleading.    Then, using mutagenesis experiments, they purported to show that adaptive sensitivity to particular wavelengths of light in specific environments “evolved on at least 18 separate occasions.  These highly environment-specific adaptations seem to have occurred largely by amino acid replacements at 12 sites, and most of those at the remaining 191 (~94%) sites have undergone neutral evolution.”  In other words, evidence for genetic drift (neutral changes) swamped evidence for positive selection by 94%.  But even then, they started by assuming that the “ancestral” rhodopsin, which they “engineered” using evolutionary assumptions and mutagenesis, started with a maximal sensitivity to 500 nm light.    Clearly, Cambrian-age ancestral rhodopsin is not available for study.  The ancestral rhodopsin on which their conclusions depend, therefore, was manufactured by them in the lab, based on their assumptions of evolutionary ancestry, millions of years, and the positions of animals in a phylogenetic tree, assuming the rhodopsins had diversified by natural selection.  The reasoning seems circular.  Even so, genetic drift was far more evident than positive selection.  And, to fit the data, they had to conclude that genotypes appeared and reappeared multiple times without any particular trend.  They said, “To complicate the matter further, evolutionary changes are not always unidirectional and ancestral phenotypes may reappear during evolution.”    Since no clear evolutionary pattern became evident without evolutionary assumptions,4 therefore, it is difficult to see how this paper could be judged any more objective than the thousands of papers Hughes criticized.1.  Austin L. Hughes, “The origin of adaptive phenotypes,” (Commentary, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published September 3, 2008, doi:10.1073/pnas.0807440105.2.  Yokoyama, Tada, Zhang and Britt, “Elucidation of phenotypic adaptations: Molecular analyses of dim-light vision proteins in vertebrates,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published September 3, 2008, doi:10.1073/pnas.0802426105.3.  Nonsynonymous mutations in a gene change the amino acid in the resulting protein.  Synonymous mutations do not, because some some of the 64 possible DNA codons have “synonyms” that code for the same amino acid (there are only 20 amino acids in most proteins).4.  E.g, notice the evolutionary assumptions in this excerpt from the paper: “The ancestors of bony fish most likely used rhodopsins with [lambdamax-s (maximum sensitivity wavelength)] of ~500 nm (Fig. 1).  What types of light environment did these ancestors have?  The origin of many early vertebrate ancestors is controversial [i.e., the Cambrian explosion], but that of bony fish ancestors is clear [referring to a 1988 text on Vertebrate Paleontology and Evolution].  The fossil records from late Cambrian and early Ordovician, ~500 Mya, show that the ancestors of bony fish lived in shallow, near-shore marine environments (30�32).  Therefore, pigment a must have functioned as a surface rhodopsin and its lambda-max would be consistent with that role.  Interpolating from the ancestral and contemporary rhodopsins, it is most likely that pigments b�d and f�h (lambdamax ~ 501�502 nm) were also surface rhodopsins, pigment i (496 nm) was an intermediate rhodopsin, and pigments e, j, and k (480�485 nm) were deep-sea rhodopsins (Fig. 1).  From their predicted lambdamax-s, it is also likely that pigments q, r, s, and v were intermediate rhodospins [sic] and pigment u was a deep-sea rhodopsin (Fig. 1)…. Based on the four types of dim-light vision, vertebrates show six different evolutionary paths (Fig. 1)….”  Later, they gave a Lamarckian description: “When moving into new dim-light environments, vertebrate ancestors adjusted their dim-light vision by modifying their rhodopsins.”Wow.  The damage to evolutionist credibility from these two papers can hardly be overstated.  Hughes just wiped away stacks and stacks of papers that Ken Miller and Eugenie Scott might have piled up in a courtroom to demonstrate the overwhelming evidence for evolution, then he held up a very weak paper as the best example yet.  We looked into that paper and found nothing but evolutionary assumptions buttressing evolutionary assumptions.    Consider how weak their best evidence is.  They were talking about animals that already had eyes, retinas, optic nerves, brains and all the other organs and functions that support vision.  The only parameter that they studied was the wavelengths of light to which particular rhodopsin molecules are maximally sensitive, between 482 and 505 billionths of a meter.  But as we know from many phenomena in biology, compensating mechanisms are often at work.  It would be impossible to prove that a fish with a rhodopsin most sensitive to 489 nm would be any better evolved than one with a rhodopsin most sensitive to 502 nm, because the ganglion cells or optic nerve might compensate for the slight shift in sensitivity.  All we observe is that living fishes today are marvelously adapted to their particular ecological niches.    We’re only talking about virtually indistinguishable shades of green light, folks!  Are you impressed with the creative power of natural selection?  Are you impressed with scientists’ ability to demonstrate evolution at the molecular level?  During the hundreds of millions of years in which animals supposedly evolved from trilobites to philosophers, the best evolutionists can show are slight changes to sensitivity to green light in just 12 positions in one protein molecule out of the thousands of exquisitely-adapted enzymes essential for vision.  Even then, the “evolution” demonstrated is predominantly from mutational drift, with no particular functional trend, and the changes (we are told) appeared, disappeared, and reappeared 18 times.  At the most optimistic, the changes they’re talking about are microevolutionary.  Even staunch young-earth creationists would have no difficulty believing that changes this small might occur in a few thousand years.    Nothing the evolutionists have produced as evidence for natural selection (after the purge of papers by Hughes) is sufficient to distinguish between creation vs evolution models.  Should evolution be the only view sanctified in the schools?  Hughes was right on when he said that the “vast outpouring of pseudo-Darwinian hype has been genuinely harmful to the credibility of evolutionary biology as a science.”  He did nothing to repair the damage, and by pointing to an insipid paper as the best example yet after decades of hype, he actually made it worse.    This effectively undermines everything the evolutionists have told us about divining evolutionary history in the genes (e.g., 06/13/2003, 04/30/2005).  Where else could we see it?  In the fossil record?  Ha! (07/21/2003), 05/21/2004, 05/10/2008).    Undoubtedly the Darwin Party will spin this situation in their favor, by making it an illustration of the progress of triumphalist materialist secularist science.  For 8 years now, CEH has been exposing the charades behind the curtain where Charles the Extravagant, the Wizard of Flaws, and his loyal munchkins dupe people into thinking that evidence for evolution is overwhelming.  This is a prime example.  Now you know.  Get the word out!  Expose the charlatan!  We need to get out of this mythical fantasyland (09/04/2008) and back to the real world!  The Kansas School Board is counting on you!You’re off to shame the Wizard, the Blunderful Wizard of FlawsYou’ll find he is a Wimp of a Wiz if ever a Wiz there wasIf ever, oh ever, a Wimp there was the Wizard of Flaws is one becauseBecause, because, because, because, becauseBecause of the blunderful spins he doesYou’re off to shame the wizard, the Blunderful Wizard of Flaws.Use your brain.  Take courage.  Have a heart.  And bark, Toto, bark!(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Ohio’s quirky Christmas

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt ReeseThere is definitely something special about Christmas on a farm, but Ohio’s small towns and cities know how to spread a little holiday cheer as well. Here are some fun (and quirky) Christmas happenings in small towns around Ohio worth celebrating. PortsmouthThis Scioto County seat has had its share of struggles in recent years, but efforts are underway to turn the city around in a positive direction. Those efforts include spreading some Christmas cheer in 2018 with a month-long Winterfest. The Market Square in the city’s Boneyfiddle District has been transformed into a winter wonderland with outdoor ice skating, thousands of lights, and a modern take on an old-fashioned, downtown Christmas. On Dec. 15, Portsmouth is looking to break the world record for the most people simultaneously caroling. The current record is 1,822 held by Waukesha, Wis. The folks in Portsmouth are looking for 2,000 carolers at 7 p.m. on the 15th. All are welcome and it is free to participate.The holiday festivities are part of a broader effort to revitalize Portsmouth, said Matthew Seifert, president of Friends of Portsmouth.“We did a river cleanup after the floodwaters receded in the spring. That led to some momentum to do some other small projects including a movie night for families downtown in Portsmouth and then Plant Portsmouth. We ended up setting a world record for most people simultaneously potting plants. We had 1,405 people come out and we also did a massive cleanup of downtown,” he said. “For Winterfest, we were able to rent an artificial skating rink that simulates the ice skating experience. We built a larger event around that to create a destination for downtown during the Christmas period. Winterfest officially started on Dec. 2. The weather was perfect. It was sunny and 65. We had a couple thousand people come through and the ice rink was never without a line. We have a vendor village, carriage rides, Santa’s workshop where kids can tell Santa what they want for Christmas, and people exit through the Friends of Portsmouth gift shop which has different holiday themed items, many made by local artisans. We have a live nativity scene and multiple events happening through the month.”The efforts have given the city some hope this holiday season.“We have seen so many people excited to participate. One thing that has been necessary to repair in this community, I think, is the morale. For a long time, from economic depression, to the drug epidemics and everything else, the community has really felt beaten down. They are looking for things to feel proud of and we are seeing a lot more of that lately,” Seifert said. “People are excited and talking about Portsmouth and Scioto County in ways they haven’t for a long time.” AnsoniaOn Dec. 1, the Ansonia Community Pride organization hosted its inaugural Lighted Tractor Parade to showcase Darke County’s agriculture.“The community loved it!” said Erin Horst, who helped coordinate the event. “Many farmers are already talking about what they want to do for next year. We really lucked out that the rain cleared and the parade went off without inclement weather. If we can just have a normal fall and get harvest over early next year, that might help with participation.”The parade included 36 tractor, RTV and golf cart entries, with the majority being tractors. The entry fee for the parade was a donation to the Ansonia Food Pantry and it raised over $800, Horst said. Businesses stayed open late for the parade to cap off the day of events that started with a pancake breakfast and included a visit from Santa.Ansonia Community Pride organized the event that builds on other recent community activities including hanging banners honoring local veterans, paintings in town, and numerous community events. Plans are already being made for the 2nd Ansonia Lighted Tractor Parade on Dec. 7, 2019. CliftonWhile the tiny village of Clifton is fairly understated most of the year, it sets the heavens aglow during the holidays thanks to the legendary Christmas light display at Clifton Mill. The Satariano family that owns the mill is once again dazzling thousands of visitors with an incredible 4 million-light display. The display was recently featured on the ABC TV Show The Great Christmas Light Fight “Heavyweights” episode that includes the nation’s top holiday light displays. Clifton Mill won the top prize of $50,000 for the best display. The episode aired in early December.The tradition of the Christmas lights stems from the Satariano family tradition of decorating their family home each year while current owner Anthony Satariano was growing up. After buying the mill, it only seemed natural to continue the tradition on a bigger scale.“We bought 100,000 lights thinking that would be enough. We learned a lot. People would pull in and say, ‘Wow this is really neat.’ We just did more of it after that to share with people,” Satariano said. “We can get several thousand visitors on a good night.”The Clifton Mill is also in the running to win Best Public Holiday Lights Display for USA Today. You can see the contenders and vote for Clifton Mill at 10best.com/awards/travel/best-public-holiday-lights-display/. The national winners will be announced Dec. 21.last_img read more

Enterprise Startup Spotlight: Revolution Analytics, Taking on SAS, SPSS

first_imgIT + Project Management: A Love Affair Revolution Analytics is a company that provides commercial support for the open source statistical programming language R. Its flagship product is Revolution R for Enterprise, a distribution of R that competes with other commercial statistical products such as SAS and SPSS. Revolution CEO Norman H. Nie was the co-inventor of SPSS.R was created in 1993 by by Ross Ihaka and Robert Gentleman at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. It’s actually an implementation of S, a programming language that was inspired by the LISP dialect Scheme.Revolution was founded in 2007 by academics at Yale. The founders weren’t actively involved in the development of R says COO Jeff Erhardt, but since Nie joined Revolution in 2009 the company has been actively contributing back to the main R project. Also, Gentleman now sits on Revolution’s board.Although R includes a graphical user interface (GUI), Revolution provides its own a Web-based GUI. Both R and R for Enterprise are available for Windows, Linux and OSX. Revolution offers R for Enterprise to academics for free. Revolution recently added the ability to natively import SAS data sets. It also announced its SAS to R challenge. Revolution will convert SAS code into R for free for qualified participants.Revolution has several big name enterprise customers, including Bank of America and Pfizer. But one of the more interesting customers is CARDIODX, a genomic diagnostics company focused on – you guessed it – cardiology. CARDIODX uses R for Enterprise to process gigabytes of genomic data in order to predict the likelihood you’ll come down with a cardiovascular disease.R and Revolution are also being used by consultants to provide data analysis as a service, something that licensing agreements on competing products prohibits says Erhardt. According to Crunchbase, Revolution has received $17.6 million in funding from Intel Capital and North Bridge Venture Partners. Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… klint finley Tags:#enterprise#Products center_img Related Posts 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo…last_img read more

Don’t Let This Happen to You

first_imgDoor design detailsThe photo at right is from an entry that’s just 15 years old. Fortunately, it was able to be repaired. I haven’t always been so lucky. Let’s just say that replacing subfloor and framing is no fun. A safe assumption is that, for one reason or another, doors always leak. They shouldn’t, but they do. Seals wear out. Wind blows. Jambs rot. Sills crack. Weepholes clog. Following are some ways to mitigate the chance of damage.Always use a sill pan. I used to make my own out of lead, a practice (and a material) I would not recommend. Then I used custom-soldered copper pans, but only on the most exposed locations, due to cost. Less-exposed locations received pans made from bituminous membrane. It is imperative that the corners are sealed, which is hard to do. Simply adhering the membrane to the subfloor without creating sealed, upturned corners only relocates the water. Now it’s easy: I specify one of the ready-made sill pans. It is important, however, to seal the sill pan to the subfloor and the door sill to the pan to prevent air leakage and flexing of the door sill.Choose the right sill type. When it’s important to be historically correct, I call for real wood sills, protected with epoxy paint or a penetrating sealer such as Penofin or Sikkens. Otherwise I prefer adjustable aluminum or fiberglass sills. They are usually available in brown or tan, if mill finished aluminum is not desired. Turning a few screws is enough to snug the sill against the door to stop water and air from getting through. Where the side jamb meets the sill there is usually a big dollop of butyl caulking. Don’t cut it away the way I did as a novice carpenter—it is necessary for sealing the transition between components. I like to order doors with “long horns” on the sills, meaning that the sill extends to the outside edge of the casing instead of the inside edge, where a vulnerable corner is susceptible to moisture. It takes more care to work with and is usually a special order, but I’ve repaired enough doors to consider it a worthwhile detail.Use rot-proof jambs. An added benefit to an adjustable sill’s air-sealing capability is the fact that it’s rot-proof. Rot usually starts at the bottom of the jambs. The end grain wicks water and rots the wood from the inside out. It shows up as paint failure after it’s too late to fix. This can be minimized by priming all sides of the jamb and leaving the caulking at the sill joint. Some manufacturers offer an even better alternative: rot-proof lower jambs. While as a rule I don’t consider pvc or composites to be green, this is one case where it solves a real problem.Storm doors are often discouraged because excessive heat buildup can damage the doors they are meant to protect, and if you live in a warm climate, you wouldn’t want them anyway. Anywhere that’s cold part of the year, though, I would still like to use them. They are a first line of defense, the same way siding takes the brunt of the weather but has housewrap behind it. Plus, in warm weather the storm panel can be swapped out for a screen panel, allowing for natural ventilation.Overhangs should protect every door. I know it’s not always possible, but a porch roof or some other form of protection is a good goal. Not only does an overhang keep rain from hitting the door on its way down, it also minimizes damaging splashback. An overhang also keeps the summer sun from baking south-facing doors. My favorite reason for overhangs: They offer a protected location to ease the transition between indoors and out.last_img read more

PBA summons Mila’s Lechon for dismal display in 47-point roasting

first_imgAFP official booed out of forum Drilon blasts Duterte’s infra program as ‘dismal failure’ PLAY LIST 02:45Drilon blasts Duterte’s infra program as ‘dismal failure’00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Vicente blasts UE starters after blowout loss to UST PBA IMAGESIn the wake of its four-game losing start in the 2018 PBA D-League Aspirants’ Cup, Mila’s Lechon will be summoned to the Commissioner’s Office to explain its side following its humiliating 55-102 defeat to Zark’s Burger-Lyceum.Officials from the league’s technical committee confirmed that the team management, led by coach Jesse Ricardo, will meet PBA commissioner Willie Marcial on Friday in the league office in Libis after yet another pitiful loss from Mighty Roasters.ADVERTISEMENT Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Read Next Making matters worse was Ricardo being assessed with a technical foul for calling excessive timeouts with 2:44 remaining in the game and with the Jawbreakers already leading, 99-53.The Mighty Roasters have lost their four games by an average of 26.25 points, with this 47-point rout being their worst defeat in the conference. 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena stingcenter_img Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH MOST READ NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding They stumbled to their fourth straight defeat, but questions were raised following the 47-point thumping after players seemingly showed complete lack of effort in the second half.Mila’s Lechon actually played superb in the first two quarters, shocking Zark’s-Lyceum with an 11-3 start and staying in step thanks to its 42-percent shooting.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBut it was a different story after the halftime break as the Mighty Roasters showed little to no willingness to play defense, allowing the Jawbreakers to stage a 23-0 run and break the game wide open, 67-41, in the third period.Zark’s-Lyceum coach Topex Robinson also related from his players that they were being encouraged by their foes to run the score up, which translated to 38 turnover points from 30 miscues from Mila’s Lechon. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH View commentslast_img read more

Gov’t Meets Six of 10 EGC Policy Recommendations

first_imgStory Highlights Additionally, he noted that the Ministry completed work to develop the framework for public debt reduction through a programme of State asset privatisation and sale. Mr. Lee-Chin also advised that the Ministry of National Security has commenced a feasibility study to create a Global Jamaican Immigration Card for issuance to members of the Diaspora. The Government has met six of the 10 Economic Growth Council (EGC) policy recommendations targeted for implementation during the April to June quarter.EGC Chairman, Michael Lee-Chin, made the disclosure at the presentation of the Council’s third quarterly report at the Spanish Court Hotel in New Kingston on Thursday, July 27.The policy recommendations come under three areas of reform – business climate, specifically public procurement; asset utilisation, in particular debt reduction and State asset privatisation; and Diaspora involvement in relation to immigration.Mr. Lee-Chin said that among the targets met in the area of business climate reform was work by the Ministry of Finance and the Public Service to draft the Public Procurement (Techniques, Procedures and Offsets) Regulations and Public Procurement (Reconsideration and Review) Regulations, which were completed and tabled in Parliament in May.Additionally, he noted that the Ministry completed work to develop the framework for public debt reduction through a programme of State asset privatisation and sale.The Chairman noted, however, that the May timeline to finalise and table the Public Procurement (Registration and Classification of Suppliers) Regulations, and complete the Handbook of Public Sector Procurement Procedures were missed.“The Ministry of Finance and the Public Service has advised that they are actively working on the establishment of the Public Procurement Commission, which is a prerequisite for the tabling of the third (set of) regulations,” he said.“Public procurement is an important tool for stimulating economic growth and development. The central government and its public bodies, together, purchased approximately $100 billion of goods and services last year. We are, therefore, urging the Ministry of Finance to urgently finalise the regulations and enact the Public Procurement Act,” he emphasised.center_img The Government has met six of the 10 Economic Growth Council (EGC) policy recommendations targeted for implementation during the April to June quarter. Mr. Lee-Chin also advised that the Development Bank of Jamaica (DBJ) met the April timeline for the creation of a protocol supporting the establishment of enterprise teams to handle transactions related to improving the scalability and efficiency of the privatisation and sale of State assets as well as the public/private partnership process through which these would be pursued.Additionally, he said the DBJ submitted a protocol and framework to Cabinet for the outsourcing of privatisation processes to for-profit firms.The Chairman pointed out, however, that Urban Development Corporation (UDC) and Factories Corporation of Jamaica, which fall under the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, missed the May timeline for the submission of a plan to divest up to 20 per cent of their assets.“The Ministry is finalising the submissions with respect to the UDC’s assets, and the FCJ’s Board is working on a list of assets to be proposed for divestment,” he informed.Mr. Lee-Chin also advised that the Ministry of National Security has commenced a feasibility study to create a Global Jamaican Immigration Card for issuance to members of the Diaspora.This exercise, which got underway in May, is being undertaken by the Sir Arthur Lewis Institute for Social and Economic Studies (SALISES) at the University of the West Indies Mona Campus in St. Andrew.Chairman of the EGC’s Diaspora Engagement Subcommittee, Dr. David Panton, told delegates attending the just concluded Jamaica 55 Diaspora Conference that SALISES was selected through a competitive tender process.Meanwhile, Mr. Lee-Chin advised that while regulatory amendments that will facilitate the investment of pension funds in a wide range of products have been drafted, the June timeline for their tabling in Parliament has been deferred to allow for further analysis and consultations.last_img read more