Tag: 上海千花夜兰验证

Daily Bullets (November 9)

first_imgFootball newsYou won’t read a better game story than this one from Berry Tramel. Great headline too. (NewsOK)I agree with this. I want Bedlam to be for a spot in the College Football Playoff. (CRFF)Mike Gundy with a #truthbomb. “If our guys look past tomorrow’s practice, you’re vulnerable.” (NewsOK)Glenn Spencer keeps doing yeoman’s work here trying to pump advanced stats at us. What a dude. (NewsOK)AdChoices广告Berry Tramel ranks Oklahoma State as the No. 1 team in the Big 12 as of right now. (NewsOK)Oklahoma State has a 36 percent chance to win out. (ESPN)Mason Rudolph: “I think we’ve been taking every game seriously and taking every game one at a time. We’re going to continue to do that and prepare for Iowa State. (O’Colly)Here’s how 538 sees it. (538)Oklahoma State is the No. 5 team in the country. (PFB)I enjoy Gerald Tracy’s Sunday thoughts on the game. This week’s is no different. (CRFF)Walsh pulling a Gundy on Rudolph: “He loves the game a lot (!), so when we make a big play on offense, he’s fired up.” (O’Colly)Around the countryOnly 14 teams can make the playoff. Oklahoma State is one of them. (OKTC)Yup, the Big 12 needs an undefeated team which I don’t really think is going to happen. (ESPN)🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 (CBS)This Mizzou thing has turned into (and is) a really big deal. (Yahoo)Hoops newsMust read here from John Helsley on Sean Sutton. Wowza. “In some ways, I felt like I sold out to protect my family’s future, instead of maybe taking the right career path that might have led to a different outcome in my career.” (NewsOK)Pistols Firing stuffThe “nine and oh” chant was spectacular. (PFB)Glenn Spencer celebrates wins with fried chicken. (PFB)Mike Gundy does “The Gundy.” (PFB) While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Big cats love Calvin Klein cologne

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — Workers in Wildlife Conservation Societies around the world are using a new technique to lure big cats to their heat-and-motion-sensitive cameras and keep them there long enough to enable them to be identified. The new technique is to spray the area with cologne, but not just any fragrance – it has to be Calvin Klein’s “Obsession for Men”. Cheetah. Image: Wikimedia Commons. Big cats, wild pigs and short-eared dogs — oh, my! The idea began in the Bronx Zoo in 2003, when general curator Pat Thomas decided to test the effects of 24 fragrances on two cheetahs. The zoo had long sprayed perfumes on rocks in the cats’ enclosure to keep them curious, but Thomas decided to be a little more scientific and test individual scents. The results showed “Obsession for Men” was a clear winner, with the cats spending an average of 11.1 minutes in savoring the scent and obviously loving the musky perfume, rubbing their cheeks against trees that had been sprayed. Other scents did not perform so well for the cats, with Revlon’s “Charlie” occupying them for only 15.5 seconds, and Estée Lauder’s “Beautiful” keeping them interested for a mere two seconds.After Thomas’s trials, word spread through the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and use of the cologne has spread from zoos to protected areas of jungle in wildlife conservation regions, where it is finding success in luring big cats of all kinds to cameras placed along remote animal trails. In Guatemala, for example, Roan Balas McNab uses the perfume in the Maya Biosphere Reserve, one of the largest protected regions in South America, to attract jaguars to the area around the cameras and keep them there long enough for the individuals to be identified by their unique patterns of spots. Since the cologne has been used the number of cats lingering in the vicinity of the cameras has increased threefold, and this will help the researchers to better estimate the size of the population of the reclusive cats. Researchers studying the cats have also been able to capture on video rarely seen events such as mating rituals near the cameras.Program coordinator of the Jaguar Conservation Program run by the WCS said they plan to expand the use Obsession for Men to its jaguar population studies next year in Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru, Nicaragua, and Venezuela.Calvin Klein’s “Obsession for Men” was launched in 1986 and is still one of the top ten best-selling fragrances for men in the world. The “nose” who helped create the cologne, Ann Gottlieb, said there were a number of ingredients that might attract animals, such as synthetic animal “notes” like the musky scent secreted by the civet.Mr McNab initially hesitated to spread the word about the fragrance fearing poachers might use it, but he decided the benefits to science outweighed the risk since the fragrance is rare in stores near the rainforests and it is expensive, and poachers use dead animals as an effective bait to lure the cats. The WCS’s ethics do not permit researchers to use dead animals. Explore furthercenter_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com Citation: Big cats love Calvin Klein cologne (2010, June 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-06-big-cats-calvin-klein-cologne.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Seethroughwall surveillance with WiFi shown at UCL

first_img More information: Through-the-Wall Sensing of Personnel Using Passive Bistatic WiFi Radar at Standoff Distances, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 50, issue 4, pp. 1218-1226, DOI:10.1109/TGRS.2011.2164411ABSTRACTIn this paper, we investigate the feasibility of uncooperatively and covertly detecting people moving behind walls using passive bistatic WiFi radar at standoff distances. A series of experiments was conducted which involved personnel targets moving inside a building within the coverage area of a WiFi access point. These targets were monitored from outside the building using a 2.4-GHz passive multistatic receiver, and the data were processed offline to yield range and Doppler information. The results presented show the first through-the-wall (TTW) detections of moving personnel using passive WiFi radar. The measured Doppler shifts agree with those predicted by bistatic theory. Further analysis of the data revealed that the system is limited by the signal-to-interference ratio (SIR), and not the signal-to-noise ratio. We have also shown that a new interference suppression technique based on the CLEAN algorithm can improve the SIR by approximately 19 dB. These encouraging initial findings demonstrate the potential for using passive WiFi radar as a low-cost TTW detection sensor with widespread applicability.via Popsci, Extremetech This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) — A surveillance device that uses WiFi radio waves has been devised to see through walls to detect, in military and surveillance parlance, moving personnel targets. The device serves as a radar prototype designed by two UK scientists at the University College London (UCL). The scientists devised the radar prototype as a way to track Wi-Fi signals in order to spy through walls. Their device identifies frequency changes to detect the moving objects. An important feature of their work is that since the device itself does not emit radio waves, it cannot be detected; it operates in stealth. © 2012 Phys.org Explore furthercenter_img Researchers develop “rectenna” to convert radio waves to electricity Citation: See-through-wall surveillance with WiFi shown at UCL (2012, August 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-08-see-through-wall-surveillance-wifi-shown-ucl.html Karl Woodbridge and Kevin Chetty, researchers at University College London, designed their detector to be able to use these signals. Chetty is a lecturer in the Department of Security and Crime Science at University College London; Woodbridge is with the school’s Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering. The two demonstrate what is called a “passive radar system” that can see through walls using WiFi signals generated by wireless routers and access points. “Passive” radar systems detect and track objects by processing reflections from “non-cooperative” sources of illumination in the environment, such as commercial broadcast and communications signals.The scientists’ paper, “Through-the-Wall Sensing of Personnel Using Passive Bistatic WiFi Radar at Standoff Distances” coauthored with G.E. Smith, appeared in the April issue of Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions. The prototype is about the size of a suitcase and it carries two antennae and signal processing unit, to monitor baseline WiFi frequency in an area for any change that would indicate movement. The device in tests successfully determined a person’s location, speed and direction through a brick wall that was one-foot-thick. See Through The Wall (STTW) technologies are of great interest to law enforcement and military agencies; this particular device has the UK Military of Defense exploring whether it might be used in “urban warfare,” for scanning buildings. Other more benign applications might range from monitoring children to monitoring the elderly. According to Woodbridge, some challenges remain which he and others involved in the research will attempt to resolve. The UCL team hopes to raise system sensitivity so that their system can pick up and detect not only people who are moving but also people who are standing or sitting still. The device, he said, may be made to be sensitive enough to pick up on subtle motions that the ribcage makes in breathing in and out.Wi-Fi radio signals are found in homes worldwide. Strategy Analytics, a market intelligence company, found in its recent study that 439 million households by the end of 2011 worldwide had WiFi network setups, or about 25 percent of all households. The same report predicts that the worldwide number of Wi-Fi households will reach nearly 800 million in 2016, a penetration rate of 42 percent.last_img read more