Lawsuit seeks to recognize vonRosenberg as bishop of South Carolina

first_img March 6, 2013 at 4:24 pm Ignoring your intemperate reference, let it be clear there are many of us in the Anglican Communion who care deeply that Bishop von Rosenberg will be successful in this endeavour. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Joseph F Foster says: Rector Washington, DC March 6, 2013 at 3:22 pm This is a matter of state jurisdiction. The Feds will throw this back to the state courts. Nice try, but a waste of money; however, the Dragon Lady doesn’t care. Featured Events Zachary Brooks says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ronald Caldwell says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 March 7, 2013 at 9:31 am Those here who want to talk about lack of Christian charity and name calling, let’s not forget that our Presiding Bishop did some of that recently. Comparing Bishop Lawrence to terrorist and the Sandy Hook shooter. Wow! Don’t know about you but I think our leadership could show a little more restraint and lot more civility. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Steven Long says: Chris Walchesky says: walter combs says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs March 6, 2013 at 6:42 pm I am really surprised at the name calling that is going on by those who have left the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion. Where is that mature, adult faith that Jesus talks about? Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI March 7, 2013 at 9:15 am Chris, you are right. Anyone familiar with South Carolina law knows this will probably not go well for TEC Unlike what usually happens in other states, SC is a different animal and we will probably lose out. I’m really ashamed that my church is ready to spend enormous amounts of money much better used for other purposes to attempt to seize properties that are destined to remain with those who have chosen to leave us. Seems really vendictive to me.PCUSA has shown much more Christian charity to departing congregations by being willing to negotiate settlements. Can’t we do the same? Vance Mann says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Nicholas Forde says: Ronald Caldwell says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL March 7, 2013 at 9:25 am Christians bringing lawsuits against each other is a scandal, but here we are anyway. It was the Lawrence diocese that started this with its Jan. 4 suit in state court claiming all legitimacy as the Episcopal diocese including the property. They compounded this with continually adding co-signers and by getting two restraining orders against the ongoing Episcopal diocese between Jan. 4 and Feb. 1. TEC had little choice but to react legally in the best way they knew how. We are now awaiting the response of the federal court judges in Charleston.The Lawrence side might take comfort in the fact that they filed first on the claim of legitimacy. Their suit to the legal rihts of the diocese is already pending in the state court. Too, they got a court order to prevent vonRosenberg and his diocese from using the names of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina, something that vonRosenberg did in the suit he just filed in the federal court. It is possible the federal fudges will stand down in favor of the previous court actions in January.The vonRosenberg side might take comfort in the fact that their action is in federal court claiming jurisdiction of federal law and citing in the complaint federal laws and cases. On the whole, courts around the country have overwhelmingly ruled what vonRosenberg is claiming, that the Episcopal Church is an hierarchical institution with a right to manage its own structure. Not a single one of the four earlier breakaway dioceses finally prevailed in court. One was settled for TEC and the others are pending on appeal.Indeed, the only court case in the country that was finally settled on the side of a breakaway group against the Episcopal Church diocese was All Saints Waccamaw (Pawley’s Island). Ironically, the Lawrence diocese is counting on this to be their fire wall and save them in the end. Since that case was not heard in federal court, however, no one knows what will happen if the issue goes to federal court. But if I were a betting person, I should not bet against TEC. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books March 7, 2013 at 5:07 pm Anybody who was baptized in the Episcopal Churc h before 1982 did not take that particular vow because it was not a part of the baptism rite. Therefore it was not a part of the vows agreed to renew at a person’s confirmation. Take a look at the baptism in the 1928 PB and contrast it with the 1982. Rather different. Mike Lawlor says: Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service March 7, 2013 at 12:09 pm You are right Zachary. She never mentioned Lawrence by name or in any other way. I was present when she spoke. Her theme was decision making and respecting rules in the context of community. Her references to people who act outside the rules were generic but she did give examples. She never mentioned Lawrence. People who hate her will see whatever they wish in her remarks. This is a reflection of their own minds, not hers. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Posted Mar 6, 2013 March 7, 2013 at 1:26 am Not looking good for TEC at all. Oh well. The lawsuits had a good run. Comments are closed. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA walter combs says: South Carolina Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI March 7, 2013 at 12:40 pm I’m familiar enough with South Carolina law to know that the law of the United States, which rules overwhelmingly in favor of national Churches, applies in South Carolina. Just like the canons of the Episcopal Church apply in the Diocese of South Carolina, no matter what the bishop says. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY House of Bishops, Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA March 6, 2013 at 6:41 pm another of the finest hour of the leadership of the Episcopal Church. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Zachary Brooks says: March 7, 2013 at 2:17 pm Read the whole sermon- she’s actually warning the true Diocese against certain attitudes which she sees as harmful in its decisions about its future course. She went on to say “What are those of you in this Diocese going to do in your interactions with those who’ve departed? Are they law-breakers who should be shot down or thrown in jail? Do we see them as vigilantes? Neither is going to produce more abundant life, my friends. When you meet them out there in the pasture, consider that some of the sheep may think they’re listening to the voice of the Good Shepherd. Some are also simply exhausted.” Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET March 7, 2013 at 1:42 pm Oh, please! We all knew to whom she was referring. She didn’t have to mention him ‘by name’. This is the kind of bunk that makes me question whether I should continue in TEC. I don’t hate the PB but even I knew and everyone else with common sense knew to whom she was referring. March 7, 2013 at 10:29 pm Bravo Mr. Combs! At least someone hear knows and can speak the truth. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Deacon Tom Williams says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Zachary Brooks says: Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK walter combs says: Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Danny L Anderson Jr says: Lawsuit seeks to recognize vonRosenberg as bishop of South Carolina Comments (16) March 6, 2013 at 6:29 pm You are not even recognized by The See Of Canterbury and not in Communion with Canterbury, yet you still call your selves Episcopalians and Anglicans … Name calling is not something Jesus would do . If you want to leave than by all means do so , but you cant take what is not yours with you . Previous ENS coverage about South Carolina is available here.[The Episcopal Church in South Carolina] Acting to protect the identity of the diocese he serves, the Right Reverend Charles G. vonRosenberg filed suit in U.S. District Court today against Bishop Mark Lawrence, asking the court to declare that only vonRosenberg, as the bishop recognized by The Episcopal Church, has the authority to act in the name of Diocese of South Carolina.Having renounced The Episcopal Church, Bishop Lawrence is no longer authorized to use the diocese’s name and seal. By doing so, he is engaging in false advertising, misleading and confusing worshippers and donors in violation of federal trademark law under the Lanham Act, the complaint says. It asks the court to stop Bishop Lawrence from continuing to falsely claim that he is associated with the Diocese of South Carolina, which is a recognized sub-unit of The Episcopal Church.The suit does not address property issues directly. But by asking the federal court to recognize Bishop vonRosenberg as the true bishop of the diocese, the suit would effectively resolve the issue of who controls diocesan property and assets, including the Diocesan House and Camp Saint Christopher on Seabrook Island. The ownership of individual parish properties is not addressed in the complaint.“The intention of this suit is straightforward. We are asking the court to determine who is authorized to serve as bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina,” Bishop vonRosenberg said.The Episcopal Church is a “hierarchical” church, meaning that it is governed by a common authority, the General Convention, with regional bodies – dioceses – that are subordinate, and individual parishes and missions that are subordinate to their dioceses. The hierarchical nature of The Episcopal Church has been recognized in multiple U.S. Supreme Court cases as far back as 1872.Under the First Amendment, the designated authorities in a hierarchical church have the authority to determine how church controversies are resolved, not civil courts. The complaint cites two United States Supreme Court decisions: Serbian Eastern Orthodox Diocese v. Milivojevic (1979) and Hosanna-Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church and School v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (2012).In October 2012, after a Disciplinary Board of The Episcopal Church found Bishop Lawrence had engaged in conduct “constituting abandonment of The Episcopal Church by an open renunciation of the Discipline of the Church,” the Presiding Bishop, the Most Reverend Katharine Jefferts Schori, restricted Bishop Lawrence from exercising his ministry until the House of Bishops could investigate the Disciplinary Board’s findings and act. In response, Bishop Lawrence announced that he and the diocese had disassociated from The Episcopal Church, withdrawing its accession to the church Constitution.On December 5, the Presiding Bishop accepted Bishop Lawrence’s renunciation of ministry in The Episcopal Church. Left without a bishop, local Episcopalians worked together to reorganize and carry on the diocese. On January 26, the Presiding Bishop convened delegates of the remaining TEC parishes and missions at a special convention. They elected Bishop vonRosenberg as their provisional bishop, acting under the Constitution and Canons of The Episcopal Church. Now, only Bishop vonRosenberg has the right to act as the Bishop of the Diocese, the lawsuit says.Just before that convention, the breakaway group headed by Bishop Lawrence filed suit in South Carolina Circuit Court against The Episcopal Church, and were granted a temporary injunction banning the remaining Episcopalians from using the name of the diocese. That injunction remains in effect.The order by Circuit Judge Diane Goodstein forced local Episcopalians to temporarily adopt a working name for their diocese so they could conduct business without violating the injunction. At their special convention they chose the name “The Episcopal Church in South Carolina” to use until the issue can be resolved.In explaining the hierarchical nature of the church, the suit notes that a person ordained as bishop must promise to “guard the faith, unity and discipline of the Church” and to “share with [his or her] fellow bishops in the government of the whole church.”The Diocese of South Carolina throughout its history has acted as a subordinate unit of The Episcopal Church, sending representatives to General Convention as recently as 2012, participating in the Church Pension Fund, and conducting business following TEC procedures. And it has held itself out to the public as the official representative of The Episcopal Church in eastern South Carolina.Representing Bishop vonRosenberg in the federal civil action are:Matthew D. McGill of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, Washington, DC.Palmer C. Hamilton and George A. LeMaistre, Jr. of Jones Walker, Mobile, AL.Thomas S. Tisdale and Jason S. Smith of Hellman, Yates and Tisdale, Charleston, SC. Mr. Tisdale is Chancellor of the Diocese. Tags Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ March 7, 2013 at 11:52 am No, she didn’t. This is one of those false accusations that seems true merely because it is repeated so often, and it’s yet another scandal in this matter that Christians are willing to believe it. Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET last_img read more

Churches have role to play in fostering civil discourse in…

first_imgChurches have role to play in fostering civil discourse in society Forum’s speakers agree people of faith can be catalysts for good in tough conversations Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rev. Steven Hagerman says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing October 23, 2014 at 4:17 pm The third paragraph of this article refers to three world faiths yet Islam was not represented.There were often comments about the three abrahamic faiths yet Islam was not represented.And I believe a question submitted to the moderator concerning the absence of a Muslim presence was not addressedWhy? November 1, 2014 at 8:06 pm Based on our civil discourse surrounding “the issue” over the last ten years, I have to wonder if maybe we should concentrate on taking the log out of our own eye before trying to remove the speck from another’s? Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service October 24, 2014 at 9:53 am I am wondering how this model might play out in interfaith conversations around Palestine and Israel. Is there a willingness to discuss the hard and difficult issues which some have chosen to avoid for decades? I think of what Jewish liberation theologian Marc Ellis called ‘the ecumenical deal’ and whether this model of civil discourse has the potential to break the deal and open the door to these difficult conversations in a constructive way. Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Alan Neale says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 23, 2014 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Comments (4) Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Kenneth Knapp says: The Rev. Tim Safford, rector of Christ Church in Philadelphia, Oct. 22 greets those attending the Episcopal Church’s forum, Civil Discourse in America: Finding Common Ground for the Greater Good, while Diocese of Pennsylvania Bishop Provisional Clifton Daniel looks on. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Philadelphia] Americans are increasingly worried about the country’s polarized political debate and religious communities can help foster a return to respectful dialogue, said panelists in the Episcopal Church’s civil discourse forum here Oct. 22.All three Abrahamic faiths — Judaism, Christianity and Islam — believe people are created in God’s image, Rabbi Steve Gutow, president and CEO of the Jewish Council on Public Affairs, reminded participants, and so people of faith must encounter each other as if they have a spark of God’s great wisdom in them that others can learn from, even when they do not agree with each other.Faith communities, he said, must act out of what he called a passionate commitment to what they believe God is telling them to do as well as a passionate commitment to the idea that each person is created in the image of God and thus must be honored.Diocese of Rochester Bishop Prince Singh, noting that the forum had gathered on the Hindu festival of lights known as Diwali, said that it is a spiritual discipline to resist the urge to demonize opponents and instead to strive to bring light rather than heat to conversations on potentially divisive issues.Produced by The Episcopal Church, the 90-minute forum, titled Civil Discourse in America: Finding Common Ground for the Greater Good, was webcast from Christ Church in Philadelphia (Diocese of Pennsylvania), the birthplace of the Episcopal Church and the church that significantly figured in the United States’ founding.The sessions are available for on-demand viewing here.Organizers developed a facilitator’s guide to assist in group discussions and better understanding of the forum. Information about the guide is here and it is available for downloading here.“Our conversations are limited by human frailty, but they can also partake of divine and eternal possibilities,” Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said in her keynote address, adding that the latter is possible when conservationalists approach each other not as enemies but instead as a “gifted, blessed human being who might have a gift to give us.”“I remain convinced that face-to-face conversations have more possibility of being life-giving than the disembodied ones we engage so much in by text, tweet and blog,” she said.“When we fail to see the very human beauty and blemishes in our conversation partners, it is easy to injection venom rather than expect transformation.”Before the forum’s two panels began, Robert Jones, the chief executive office of the Public Religion Research Institute, briefly summarized an overview of public opinion polls his organization conducted with the Episcopal Church in conjunction with the forum. The overview, “Is Civility Still Possible? What Americans Want in Public Leaders and Public Discourse,” concluded that “despite being divided by generation, by religion, by race, and by political party allegiances, Americans express a strong preference for compromise” and the “public appetite for compromise is growing.”The country’s fragmented and polarized media contribute to the lack of civility in public discourse, the report concluded, as media outlets “reward extreme rhetoric with political discussion that often aims to create conflict and drama at the expense of moderation.”Yet, “the overwhelming majority of the public believes that the lack of civil discourse is a major problem for the functioning of our political system,” according to the report.Religious institutions are hampered in their efforts to foster dialogue because congregations continue to be segregated along racial and even ideological lines, the report concluded. “Religious bodies must also navigate the declining levels of trust in civic institutions, particularly among young adults,” the report said. “When religious leaders focus on divisive issues, Americans are more likely to perceive them as part of the problem rather than as a potential solution.”Civil discourse forum panelist John J. DeGioia, president of Georgetown University, makes a comment while, from left, Paul Brandeis Raushenbush, executive religion editor for the Huffington Post; Rabbi Steve Gutow, president and CEO of the Jewish Council on Public Affairs; Elizabeth McCloskey, president and CEO of The Faith & Politics Institute; and Bishop Prince Singh of the Episcopal Diocese of Rochester listen. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceDuring the panel on civil discourse and faith, John J. DeGioia, president of Georgetown University, agreed with Jefferts Schori’s focus on face-to-face conversations. One-on-one conversations, he said, often result in far fewer disagreements than do larger discussions during which individuals rarely connect with each other.In those small conversations, the participants find there is far more that hold them together than that separates them, he said, adding that churches need to emphasize the commonalities in the human community.Elizabeth McCloskey, president and CEO of The Faith & Politics Institute, invoked what she called President Abraham Lincoln’s humility and conviction that each person has a vocation to try to achieve a more perfect union. She urged faith leaders to preach both that humility and that assumption of honorable intent.Saying that many in the U.S. Congress want to compromise but think their constituents do not want them to do so, McCloskey said she would like to see faith leaders model civil discourse “and then have people of faith … start to demand political leaders who will compromise, who will engage in deliberative debate.”South by Southwest Interactive Festival Director Hugh Forrest talks about creativity and diversity while, from left, moderator Paul Brandeis Raushenbush, executive religion editor for the Huffington Post; Carolyn J. Lukensmeyer, executive director of the National Institute for Civil Discourse; and David Boardman, dean of the School of Media and Communication at Temple University in Philadelphia, listen. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceDuring the second panel, on civil discourse in politics and policy, Carolyn J. Lukensmeyer, executive director of the National Institute for Civil Discourse, warned against believing that the country is truly as divided as the U.S. Congress. Instead, she said, what Alexis de Tocqueville saw in Americans in 1838 is still true today: Presented with a problem, they quickly leave behind ideologies and look for solutions.“That is an extraordinary asset about where we are right now,” she said.Addressing the media’s role in civil discourse, David Boardman, dean of the School of Media and Communications at Temple University, said, “Americans use the media the way a drunk uses a lamp post – for support, not illumination.” While American “media monopolies” have been fractured in ways that have often led to a loss of resources that support deep, investigative reporting, the fracturing has also led to the creation of very issue- and geographically-specific media that are providing willing consumers with reporting at a greater depth and breadth than ever before.South by Southwest Interactive Festival Director Hugh Forrest said the festival discovered that requiring diversity among the festival’s panelists resulted in a creativity that the gathering had lacked earlier.Rabbi Gutow and Bishop Singh also participated in the first panel.Paul Brandeis Raushenbush, executive religion editor for the Huffington Post, moderated the panel discussions.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Donna Hicks says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC October 23, 2014 at 4:53 pm We will do well to model our vision of civil discourse in resolving the tensions at General Seminary.Hopefully there has been a good beginning to this. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

El Obispo Tengatenga habla sobre la fe, la controversia y…

first_img Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service – Charleston, Carolina del Sur] James Tengatenga, antiguo obispo de Malawi del Sur que preside actualmente el Consejo Consultivo Anglicano (CCA), dice que la Comunión Anglicana sigue estando en medio de dolorosos conflictos que han hecho que sus miembros “piensen acerca de lo que somos y por lo que estamos, y no sólo que piensen al respecto, sino que realmente aborden el tema y se comprometan con él”.“De manera que uno espera que seamos más inteligentes respecto a nuestra fe y a nuestro ser”, dijo Tengatenga durante una entrevista reciente con Episcopal News Service.Tengatenga también habló durante la entrevista acerca de la estructura e importancia del CCA (el organismo que diseña la política de la Comunión), la posibilidad de un Congreso Anglicano y las influencias [que él reconoce] en su vida religiosa.ENS conversó con Tengatenga durante su visita a la 224ª. convención anual de la Iglesia Episcopal en Carolina del Sur y fue el predicador en la eucaristía de apertura de la convención.A Tengatenga lo nombraron en mayo profesor visitante distinguido de Anglicanismo Global en la Escuela de Teología de la Universidad del Sur en Sewanee, Tennessee.A continuación parece una transcripción editada del resto de la entrevista con ENS:Como presidente del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, ¿qué identifica como las prioridades de misión de la Comunión Anglicana en este momento?La primera es sencillamente estar presente con la gente en sus circunstancias —dado todo el dolor, el odio, la guerra y las calamidades naturales que le ocurren al mundo en este momento—, ya sea mediante la oración o coordinando la labor de ayuda, ser la presencia de Cristo en el mundo de esa manera.En segundo lugar, y resulta extraño ponerlo de segundo porque lo sostiene todo, la real proclamación del Evangelio verbalmente mediante la evangelización; representando continuamente el Evangelio para el pueblo de Dios y también llevando a las personas a Cristo porque esa es nuestra tarea, individualmente y como Comunión.Y, obviamente, la reconciliación en esta década espléndida y controversial que atravesamos y también sencillamente reconciliándonos con nuestra propia humanidad [la cual] espero llegue a ser testimonio al mundo, con creación, con disparidad de riqueza, con disparidad ideológica. Hablamos acerca de una globalización que debería de resonar con catolicidad, pero así no sucede. La actual globalización es hegemónica de una ideología en particular. Por consiguiente, la misión de la Iglesia, creo yo, es reconciliar eso y hacer que la gente vuelva a Dios, a reconciliarse consigo misma, a reconciliarse con la naturaleza, a reconciliarse con el orden económico.James Tengatenga, antiguo obispo de Malawi del Sur y presidente del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, predica el 7 de noviembre de 2012 en la catedral de la Santa Trinidad, en Auckland, Nueva Zelanda, durante la eucaristía de clausura de la 15ª. reunión del CCA. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.¿Cómo ha disfrutado este papel desde que se puso a la cabeza del CCA in 2009? Imagino que ha habido momentos de júbilo y de frustración.La Iglesia de Dios vive a pesar de nuestras disensiones, malentendidos y divisiones. De manera que la alegría de ver a la Iglesia Católica activa en medio de todas las confusiones es inapreciable. Y también ya he tenido dos diferentes arzobispos [de Cantórbery] con dos estilos diferentes, cada uno de los cuales comprometido a conducir la Iglesia y el pueblo de Dios en la dirección en que verdaderamente proclamará el Evangelio…y continuará edificando sobre lo que hemos recibido a través de Cristo y a través de su Iglesia.Por supuesto, el dolor es la persistente declaración del cese de relaciones. Yo la oigo —lastima oír eso— y [oigo] las culpas, a izquierda, derecha y centro, acerca de las causas y donde va a llegar. Y también he tenido que ver el estado físico de eso, porque la realidad teológica del cuerpo de Cristo se mantiene, aunque tirante, pero observar esa tirantez es doloroso y estresante porque lo consume a uno ver hermano contra hermano y hermana contra hermana, y que empiezan a demonizarse unos a otros olvidándose de la verdad de que todos somos santos.¿Cree que la Comunión Anglicana está de mejor salud ahora que hace una década?Sí, porque a veces la gente confunde lo indoloro con la salud. Me explico, yo acostumbraba a correr en una época cuando era joven, y correr en el calor de Texas 10 kilómetros a mediodía, sólo por el placer de hacerlo, lastima, pero era divertido y era sano. Creo que es ahí donde estamos. Estamos en medio de dolorosos conflictos, como suelo decir, pero eso nos ha hecho pensar acerca de quienes somos, para lo que somos y no sólo pensar al respecto, sino realmente hablar acerca de eso y comprometerse con eso. En consecuencia, uno espera, pues, que seamos más inteligentes respecto a nuestra fe y a nuestra identidad.La Comunión para aquellos de nosotros que siempre hemos sido anglicanos es algo que siempre damos por sentado y es por eso que ha sido difícil definir lo que nos mantiene unidos. No es un documento, ni una ley ni siquiera los sacramentos. Es algo que trasciende las palabras lo que nos mantiene unidos y eso es Cristo mismo y su mismo Espíritu. De suerte que luchar por articular eso, lo cual yo escucho por todas partes, es para mí una señal de salud.E incluso para aquellos que han optado por irse, ¿adivine cómo se llaman? Anglicanos esto, anglicanos lo otro. Estamos luchando en verdad por definir lo que atesoramos encarecidamente y no podemos perder. De manera que si realmente yo no quisiera esto, lo abandonaría y cuando lo hubiera abandonado no querría ser identificado con ello de ningún modo, figura o forma. Luego, ¿por qué te vas y quieres seguir siendo identificado con algo?Significa que hay algo importante en la naturaleza de la Iglesia y en el conflicto para encontrarnos a nosotros mismos y a nuestra alma y adonde Dios nos lleva. Si eso resulta doloroso, querría creer que es doloroso de la manera en que el ejercicio lo es, donde uno percibe que la salud proviene de ese conflicto de autoidentificación y de autocomprensión en Dios. Si alguien viniera y tomará plenamente la temperatura y dijera ‘esto es saludable’, siempre creería que es un asunto de Dios, no un quehacer humano. Podemos ver señales, podemos hacer algo respecto a ellas, pero compete a Dios declarar realmente la salud del pueblo de Dios.Con estructuras eclesiásticas centenarias que están siendo cuestionadas y que enfrentan reformas, ¿cree que el Consejo Consultivo Anglicano, en su constitución actual, es el modelo correcto para la labor que él y la Comunión tienen que hacer en el siglo XXI?La última reunión del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano fue del 27 de octubre al 7 de noviembre de 2012, fundamentalmente en la catedral de La Trinidad, en Auckland, Nueva Zelanda. El CCA está compuesto por obispos, sacerdotes y laicos. De una a tres personas provienen de cada una de las 38 provincias de la Comunión Anglicana, en dependencia del tamaño numérico de cada provincia. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.En la actualidad, querría decir que sí y no creo que pueda ser ninguna otra cosa distinta de lo que es ahora, en el sentido de que… tenemos un modelo. Ahora que tenemos ese modelo, ¿cómo lo perfeccionamos y hacemos que funcione como queremos a fin de organizarnos?No podemos llamarnos una ‘Comunión’ y no tener una realidad física de esa experiencia. El único lugar en que experimentamos eso —y quiero enfatizarlo— el único lugar actualmente donde experimentamos eso es en el CCA. No hay ninguna ocasión en que la Comunión se congregue de una forma visible, con representantes físicos de todas y cada una de las provincias, y de todos y cada uno de los órdenes [que en el CCA]. La pregunta es cómo lo hacemos funcionar mejor. ¿Cómo lo hacemos funcionar como ese organismo que queremos que sea?Creo que durante mucho tiempo la Comunión ha vivido como si no existiera. No que no existiera, pero vivimos como si fuera así, como si no importara. Creo que es por eso que digo que la Iglesia está en una situación más saludable ahora porque en verdad está tomando conciencia de sí misma y los sistemas que ha establecido para poder ministrar cabalmente y reflejar plenamente su catolicidad y proyectar plenamente el Evangelio de un modo que sea respetuoso de la singularidad de cada miembro individualmente, la singularidad de cada miembro en órdenes, la singularidad de cada provincia —de cada Iglesia— porque somos una comunión de iglesias. Es esto lo que facilita esa singularidad y, al mismo tiempo, esa unidad.En verdad, no estoy diciendo que sea perfecto, no sólo porque creo que la perfección pertenece al futuro y es para lo que trabajamos todos los días, sino porque creo que se trata de un organismo vivo. ¿Y existió alguna vez un tiempo en que la Iglesia siguió siendo la misma? No. A partir de la época de Jesús, hemos estado transformándonos… convirtiéndonos en lo que hemos llegado a ser.No estoy seguro de que podamos hacerlo mucho mejor en donde ahora estamos. Tomaría algunas décadas llegar a alguna parte porque trabajamos en trienios y, a veces en bienios en las diferentes provincias. De modo que , incluso si fuéramos a decir de la noche a la mañana que queremos cambiar esto, tomaría un mínimo de seis años incluso llegar a definir qué es lo que queremos antes de que podamos empezar a preguntar [si] lo hemos definido. Luego otros seis años antes que lo aceptemos.Un grupo de obispos de distintos lugares de la Comunión Anglicana se reunió recientemente en Nueva York y en su comunicado preguntó si era hora de otro Congreso Anglicano. ¿Cuál es su reacción a esa idea?Siempre ha sido hora de otro congreso. El primero fue en 1908 y como Comunión intentábamos no sólo celebrar otro, intentamos celebrar un siglo de eso con [la Conferencia de] Lambeth 2008, pero faltaron los medios económicos en ese proceso y nos falló.Yo fui parte de la planificación de la última Conferencia de Lambeth y nuestra misión inicial fue planificar un congreso —una reunión— junto con la Conferencia de Lambeth, que fuera casi un reflejo exacto del de 1908.Luego, por supuesto, el próximo [Congreso Anglicano después de la reunión de 1908] tuvo lugar en Mineápolis en el 54 y el último en Toronto [en 1963] y la idea era —ya que el de Toronto se celebró cinco años antes de la próxima Conferencia de Lambeth— que ese fuera un posible patrón para que pudiéramos congregarnos cada cinco años.Curiosamente, yo estaba tratando de esto en mi clase a principios de esta semana y hablando acerca de los jamborees. Sé que hay una opinión cínica del jamboree, pero si le pregunta a los que han asistido a uno —dado que el término proviene del movimiento de los Boy Scouts, el cual incidentalmente comenzó en 1908— ha transformado su percepción no sólo del movimiento de los exploradores [scouts], sino de su propio ser personal. Y de eso se trata.“La Comunión para aquellos de nosotros que siempre hemos sido anglicanos es algo que siempre damos por sentado y es por eso que ha sido difícil definir lo que nos mantiene unidos”, dice el obispo James Tengatenga, que preside el Consejo Consultivo Anglicano. Foto de la Diócesis de Texas.[Los congresos anglicanos] son seminales en el sentido que nos hacen pensar de nuevo en una administración sin responsabilidades. La administración es importante y no creo, como algunos han estado diciendo, que simplemente debemos reemplazar la Conferencia de Lambeth y en su lugar tener sólo el congreso. Creo, en verdad, que eso es una falacia. No puedes hacer eso [porque acabarías] creando otra cosa tipo Lambeth, porque no puede haber una organización y no tener reuniones de líderes y no tener funciones administrativas. [Pero no hay ocasión en esa clase de reuniones] de llegar a las raíces de lo que creemos y lo que podemos mirar de manera seminal en lo que los congresos han hecho.[Los congresos] han marcado nuestra vida . . . [el de]1963 nos hizo reflexionar sobre lo que significa participar en la misión en un organismo multinacional y multicultural, y en una sociedad desigual donde algunos tienen y algunos no tienen. Y ¿es cierto que algunos tienen y que algunos no tienen? O la cuestión es que algunos tienen una cosa y otros tienen otra cosa y juntos somos por tanto mutuamente responsables y mutuamente interdependientes? [El Congreso Anglicano de 1963] nos dio el lenguaje de la mutua responsabilidad, de la mutua interdependencia…Llegamos a estar atentos y en sintonía con el hecho de que estamos asociados unos con otros, pero nunca quedó bastante definido qué significa eso, ni cuánto puede durar ni que forma adopta, ni [quienes son] los dadores y los beneficiarios, y cosas por el estilo. Y nunca llegamos a entender lo que era estar en misión, de manera que los que participaban en la misión simplemente iban a otros lugares a hacer lo que creían que era importante para ellos. Podemos casi decir que de lo que nos ocupamos es lo que decíamos en la ‘Mutua Responsabilidad e Interdependencia.’ Y la mutualidad sigue siendo cuestionada; y la responsabilidad de unos con otros [sigue siendo cuestionada].De manera que estos [congresos] son seminales para el modo en que nos vemos a nosotros mismos y en que participamos en la obra de Dios. No creo que llegue el momento en que no los necesitemos. Creo que la interrogante es si podemos ser lo bastante responsables como Comunión para tratar de organizar uno, pagar la factura por él y hacerlo funcionar, y no convertirlo en un espectáculo.Usted fue el centro de una controversia el año pasado cuando le retiraron su nombramiento en Dartmouth College por el comentario que había hecho sobre la homosexualidad. ¿Qué aprendió de esa experiencia o está aún aprendiendo de ella?No creo que haya un momento en que agote el aprendizaje de esa experiencia; está cargada de toda suerte de cosas. Fue una experiencia dolorosa.Básicamente, que la gente sigue mostrándose sospechosa de lo que es ‘diferente’, cualquiera que sea lo diferente, y, a partir de ahí, emiten juicios que carecen de sustancia, pero desafortunadamente si eres tan proclive a creer en ti mismo más que en la verdad a la que te enfrentas terminas haciendo cosas.Y también aprendiendo a apreciar el amor del pueblo de Dios debido a la respuesta de respaldo que obtuve después de esa experiencia, ni siquiera puedo empezar a contar.Y también obviamente el aprender a estar en el desierto, porque llegado a ese punto, ¿qué queda?Y luego vino Sewanee. ¿Cuál ha sido su énfasis en Sewanee?Enseñar estudios de misión —misiología— y enseñarla, mirándola desde mi perspectiva, desde el mundo en que vivo como receptor —un producto de— la misión y un agente de la misión… Es básicamente como [decir], bien, ha llegado el momento de compartir mi historia con Jesús y su obra y lo que ello ha sido, pero en un sentido académico y formando a la gente para el ministerio. Y también hablando acerca del anglicanismo global.Es un privilegio, realmente, poder compartir mi experiencia vivida de la catolicidad de la Iglesia y de la manera en que funcionan los organismos de la Iglesia. Todos nosotros imaginamos que sabemos, pero lo que sabemos es sólo lo que hemos experimentado u oído dentro del contexto de la controversia actual, pero hay que pensar que la Comunión es mayor que eso y más antigua que eso. Podemos no haberlo expresado de la misma manera pero lo hemos visto desenvolverse ante nuestros ojos desde entonces.[Yo también me pregunto] cómo es ese anglicanismo actual una expresión de Dios en el mundo, en la participación de Dios en el mundo, una expresión de lo que no es más que una experiencia del pueblo de Dios en su Iglesia Católica. Ser capaz de hablar de eso y también descubrir con los estudiantes la humildad de la posición anglicana, que afirma, desde el primer día, que el anglicanismo nunca se ha considerado la suma total y plena de la Iglesia Católica. Siempre se vio como una expresión de la Iglesia Católica y nos predispuso, por tanto, hacia la unidad del pueblo de Dios y a trabajar por conseguirla.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME El Obispo Tengatenga habla sobre la fe, la controversia y la Comunión Anglicana Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Anglican Consultative Council, Rector Shreveport, LA Archbishop of Canterbury Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Anglican Communion, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Dec 17, 2014 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Communiqué from the meeting of ARCIC III in Villa Palazzola

first_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Harry W Shipps says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Communiqué from the meeting of ARCIC III in Villa Palazzola Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Comments (1) Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Belleville, IL [Anglican Communion Office] The Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) is the official body appointed by the Roman Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion to engage in theological dialogue in order that they may come into visible unity and full ecclesial communion. It held the fifth meeting of its current phase (ARCIC III) in an atmosphere of shared prayer and friendship at Villa Palazzola, the summer residence of the Venerable English College in Rome, 28 April–4 May 2015. Members of the Commission are grateful to the staff of Villa Palazzola for the warm welcome extended to them.The mandate for this third phase of ARCIC is both to promote the reception of the previous work of the Commission by presenting this as a corpus and to explore “The Church as Communion, local and universal, and how in communion the local and universal Church come to discern right ethical teaching”. To this end the Commission’s work centred on examining two draft texts which had been prepared by sub-committee drafting groups since its previous meeting in Vuleka Centre, Botha’s Hill, South Africa.The first of these draft texts considered was material to present the five agreed statements of ARCIC II so that they can be received by the respective Communions. This consists of individual introductions to each statement, whose text is included, and a brief consideration of the responses each document engendered, short essays concerning theological method and themes running through the documents, suggesting directions for future work. This work has made good progress and it is hoped that it will shortly be ready for publication.The second text considered was a draft document responding to the ecclesiological element of the mandate, that is, an examination of the structures of our two traditions which facilitate communion within and among the local and regional and universal dimensions of the Church.On Thursday 30 April the Commission travelled to Rome for a private audience with Pope Francis. The Pope encouraged the Commission in its work, and in the context of contemporary persecution of Christians noted, “There is a strong bond that already unites us which goes beyond all divisions.” Archbishop Bernard Longley thanked Pope Francis for the inspiration and leadership given by both him and Archbishop Justin Welby, “especially by your common commitment to seek justice for those who suffer exploitation or neglect.” Archbishop David Moxon cited the draft ARCIC II volume, and acknowledged with gratitude Pope Francis’s emphasis on the preaching of the Gospel, the simplicity of his personal lifestyle, his stress on ministry to the poor and marginalized, the positive role he has played in international reconciliation. He concluded by saying that all of these have “played their part in commending the ministry of the Bishop of Rome to Christians throughout the world”.Later that day they celebrated the Eucharist at the Anglican Centre in Rome, which generously hosted the Commission for lunch and for two working sessions, during which it heard a paper on sensus fidei (the sense of faith) of all the baptised, and case studies on slavery. From there the group visited the Venerable English College, where presentations of the Commission’s work were made to the student body with time for questions and answers. Members then participated in Vespers and much appreciated the opportunity to join students and staff for dinner.On Friday 1 May members welcomed Bishop Mark Santer and Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor, Co-Chairs at the last time ARCIC met at Palazzola. The special guests led an informal session in which they recounted some of the narrative of ARCIC II under their leadership. They remained until the end of the meeting.The Commission welcomed Canon John Gibaut as the new Anglican Co-Secretary, succeeding Canon Alyson Barnett-Cowan. The Commission also extended its thanks to Fr Norman Tanner SJ, who participated as a consultant.The next meeting will take place near Toronto in May 2016, when the Commission will take up a reworked draft of an ecclesiological statement comparing the instruments of communion of each tradition.APPENDIXMembers of ARCIC III present at the meetingCo-ChairsThe Most Revd Bernard Longley, Archbishop of Birmingham, EnglandThe Most Revd Sir David Moxon, Archbishop of Canterbury’s Representative to the Holy SeeRoman CatholicsThe Revd Robert Christian OP, St Albert Priory, Oakland, California, USAThe Revd Canon Adelbert Denaux, Professor Em., Brugge, BelgiumMost Revd Arthur Kennedy, Auxiliary Bishop of Boston, USAProfessor Paul D. Murray, Durham University, EnglandProfessor Sister Teresa Okure SHCJ, Catholic Institute of West Africa, NigeriaProfessor Janet E. Smith, Sacred Heart Major Seminary, Detroit, Michigan, USAThe Revd Professor Vimal Tirimanna CSsR, Alphonsianum University, Rome, ItalyThe Very Revd Dom Henry Wansbrough OSB, Ampleforth Abbey, EnglandAnglicansDr Paula Gooder, The Church of EnglandThe Rt Revd Dr Christopher Hill, The Church of EnglandThe Rt Revd Nkosinathi Ndwandwe, The Anglican Church of Southern AfricaThe Revd Canon Dr Nicholas Sagovsky, The Church of EnglandThe Revd Canon Dr Peter Sedgwick, The Church in WalesThe Revd Dr Charles Sherlock, The Anglican Church of AustraliaConsultantThe Revd Father Norman Tanner SJ, Roman Catholic ChurchStaffThe work of the Commission is supported by the two Co-SecretariesThe Revd Canon Dr John Gibaut (Anglican Communion Office)The Revd Anthony Currer  (Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity)andThe Revd Neil Vigers (Anglican Communion Office)Ms Silvana Salvati (Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity) Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs May 7, 2015 at 8:22 pm With the apparent sunset on ecumenism, this is good news and should be well covered by the Church press.+Harry W Shipps Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Posted May 6, 2015 Anglican Communion, last_img read more

JNCPB sets process for presiding bishop nominations from the floor

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA House of Bishops Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC JNCPB sets process for presiding bishop nominations from the floor Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Elections, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs center_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] The Episcopal Church Joint Nominating Committee for the Election of the Presiding Bishop (JNCPB) has released the following concerning nominating bishops from the floor for the position of Presiding Bishop.The Joint Nominating Committee for the Election of the Presiding Bishop (JNCPB) wishes to announce its process for nominating bishops to the office of the Presiding Bishop from the floor at General Convention in June 2015.The JNCPB is canonically charged with “establishing a timely process for any bishop or deputy to express the intent to nominate any other member of the House of Bishops from the floor at the time the Joint Nominating Committee presents its nominees to the joint session of the two Houses, and for each Bishop so nominated to be included in the information distributed about the nominees.” Canon I.2.1(e)(2)The procedure established by the JNCPB for nominations from the floor is as follows:Any bishop or deputy may indicate his/her intent to nominate a bishop who is not included on the list of nominees for Presiding Bishop which will be announced on May 1.The intent to nominate period will be Friday, May 1 to Tuesday, May 12.Any bishop or deputy wishing to nominate a bishop must have that bishop’s written permission to do so.To indicate the intent to nominate a bishop, send the following information via email to both the co-chairs of the JNCPB, Bishop Edward Konieczny of Oklahoma and Sally Johnson, Esq. of Minnesota ([email protected] and [email protected])1.  Full name of the bishop you wish to nominate and contact information for him/her including:•    Diocese (or other position) in which the bishop currently serves•    Home address•    Work address•    Work/office phone number•    Cell phone number•    Work email address•    Personal email address2.  Copy of the written permission for nomination from the bishop.3.  Full name of the bishop or deputy submitting the nomination with his/her intention to nominate a bishop including:•    Diocese (or other position) in which the deputy or bishop currently serves•    Work/office phone number•    Cell phone number•    Work or personal email addressIn order to be nominated at General Convention, any bishop whose name is submitted in this process will have to undergo the same background screening process that the JNCPB completed for all of its nominees including, but not limited to, criminal records check, credit check, civil court records check, driver’s license check, psychological examination, and submission of a physical examination report.In order to complete the background screening process in a timely manner, all bishops whose names are submitted through this process must complete extensive questionnaires by Friday, May 15 at 5 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time.For that reason, the JNCPB encourages bishops and deputies to submit their intent to nominate information as soon as possible after May 1.Thank you.For more info: [email protected] Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA General Convention, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 General Convention 2015, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Posted Apr 27, 2015 last_img read more

‘Women build peace’ but their voices and stories have been…

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET ‘Women build peace’ but their voices and stories have been ignored Expert: women must be allowed to claim place in ‘big decision-making spaces’ UNCSW, Women’s Ministry By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 16, 2016 Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Anglican Communion, Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Louis Stanley Schoen says: March 23, 2016 at 3:16 pm I would cite the further illustration of Black Lives Matter, an often disruptive but peaceful advocacy group predominantly led by women, at least in many areas – but also illustrating the growing phenomenon of supportive male participation in social justice movements with female leadership. Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Sustainable Development Goals, center_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini tells a gathering in the Chapel of Christ the Lord at the Episcopal Church Center on March 16 that women’s experiences and voices are often discarded and erased from decision-making processes and even from history. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] For centuries and all over the world, women have always worked for peace and, while their skills are more needed now than ever, one peacemaker says women’s stories and their abilities have been discounted and erased.Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini, co-founder and executive director of the Washington, D.C.-based International Civil Society Action Network, told a March 16 gathering at the Episcopal Church Center in New York that the rulers of the world – political and otherwise – do not acknowledge the basic fact that “when you look across time and geography when women collectively organize as women, they don’t use violence.”“We might be disrupters; we might have a level of militancy but it’s not as if you have guerilla groups of women,” said, Naraghi-Anderlini, also an adjunct professor at Georgetown University, who in 2011, was the first senior expert on gender and inclusion on the United Nations’ Mediation Standby Team. Naraghi-Anderlini was born in Iran and educated in England at Oxford and Cambridge.The March 16 gathering was connected to the 60th session of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women March 14-24. Women from across the Episcopal Church and throughout the Anglican Communion representing more than 20 countries have come to New York to attend the session and various parallel events such as Naraghi-Anderlini’s presentation.Her point about the peace-making role of women was vividly described during a question and answer session when Claudette Kigeme, the national coordinator for the Mother’s Union in Burundi, said women in her country are crying out for peace and for the protection of unarmed people, but they are speaking in a country “where truth cannot be said.”Naraghi-Anderlini said that as the U.N. lives its stated mandate of peacemaking, it must begin by paying attention to the people of its member states rather to the governments of those states, to whom the organization currently “kowtows.” And that attention needs to be paid in a coherent way that does not let other countries claim to be poised to help a trouble country when in fact they are simply pursuing their own agenda, she added.Also, she asked Kigeme, “What are the channels of access and influence that you have as an Anglican Communion” to address the ongoing conflict in Burundi. “How do you get your church leaders and others to raise these issues? Who’s whispering what to whom?”Naraghi-Anderlini warned that those in authority will often try to distract women from their goals. “What I see all the time is that they try to depoliticize us because this is really about women getting into the most exclusive male spaces” she said, the spaces of military men and high-level male politicians who “are making decisions for the future of the lives millions of people.”“And, as women, we are saying: ‘Excuse me; we want to have a space at the table.’ And they try to depoliticize us and throw us back into those social issues” and away from “the big decision-making spaces” where major political and security decisions are weighed.In her wide-ranging presentation, Naraghi-Anderlini also discussed what she said were the tensions inherent in living in a world that is more pluralistic than it has ever been, and where communications technology does not allow countries to hide conflicts between their stated values and their actions.As nations struggle to build a common identity amid growing diversity in which many groups practice identity-based politics, “a minority of extreme, exclusionary, violent groups is  are filling the void that others have not,” she said.“Extremism has gone mainstream,” Naraghi-Anderlini said. “And in this country we have to watch out because we’re seeing it in our election campaign that when you start saying stuff about people and demonizing them, you don’t know what that will do.”The Rev. Valerie Webster, left, an Episcopal Church delegate to the UNCSW from Montana, comments during a question and answer session March 16 with Sanam Naraghi-Anderlin, right, in the Chapel of Christ the Lord at the Episcopal Church Center. Beth Adamson, center, facilitated the discussion. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe UNCSW serves to promote women’s rights in political, economic, civil, social and educational fields, and to make recommendations on urgent problems regarding women’s rights. The conference has convened annually or biannually since 1946; it reached a turning point in Beijing in 1995 when it adopted a global policy framework for gender equality and the empowerment of women that identified 12 areas of critical concern.The theme for the 60th annual UNCSW is “Women’s empowerment and its link to sustainable development,” and the review theme carried over from the 57th session is “The elimination and prevention of all forms of violence against women and girls,” which includes a framework for addressing, preventing and responding to violence against women and girls.The session’s theme follows the 2015 endorsement by world leaders of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which includes 17 new Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets that aim to end poverty, combat inequalities and promote prosperity while protecting the environment. The SDGs build upon the eight Millennium Development Goals adopted in 2000Anglican and Episcopal delegates will also participate in Ecumenical Women’s advocacy, including training, ecumenical worship, visiting permanent missions at the United Nations, and continuing advocacy upon return to their local communities.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments (1) Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

Coverage of Anglican, Episcopal women at the 60th annual UNCSW

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Coverage of Anglican, Episcopal women at the 60th annual UNCSW Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Posted Mar 16, 2016 Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Anglican Communion, Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA UNCSW Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

Threshing to end global hunger

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Posted Aug 9, 2016 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Threshing to end global hunger Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Poverty & Hunger In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

WCC leaders meet Pope Francis in Rome

first_imgWCC leaders meet Pope Francis in Rome Posted Aug 25, 2017 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Tags Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing [Anglican Communion News Service] In an audience with Pope Francis in the Vatican, World Council of Churches Central Committee moderator Agnes Abuom and WCC General Secretary Olav Fykse Tveit discussed how Christian unity is vital in bringing a true sense of justice to issues the world is facing today.Full article. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

Bishops object to Archbishop of Canterbury’s decision to exclude same-sex…

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Many of the major liturgies during the Lambeth Conference of bishops take place at Canterbury Cathedral, the seat of the archbishop of Canterbury and what is considered the “mother church” of the Anglican Communion. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Hendersonville, North Carolina] The Episcopal Church’s House of Bishops said March 15 that it is “aggrieved and distressed” by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby’s decision to exclude the same-sex spouses of bishops invited to the 2020 Lambeth Conference.The bishops said they “are concerned by the use of exclusion as a means of building communion.”Welby says on the website of the gathering of Anglican Communion bishops that he prays that “the Lambeth Conference will reinvigorate the Communion.” The website notes that Welby has invited “every eligible bishop and spouse.”The majority of the house plans to go to Lambeth, according to the statement. The bishops said they want to continue to build relationships across the communion, “further the conversation around the various cultural expressions of marriage,” and “reflect our understandings of marriage, as well as our commitment to the dignity of all human beings, including the human rights of LGBTQ+ persons.”The statement passed on a voice vote. At least one bishop, Dan Martins of Springfield, could be heard voting no.Diocese of New York Bishop Assistant Mary Glasspool currently is The Episcopal Church’s only actively serving bishop who has a same-sex spouse. She addressed the house on March 14.The Rev. Thomas Brown is due to be ordained and consecrated on June 22 as the next bishop of the Diocese of Maine. He is married to the Rev. Thomas Mousin. The diocese elected Brown on Feb. 9. It is possible that Episcopal Church dioceses will elect bishops with same-sex spouses between now and the July 23, 2020, beginning of the Lambeth Conference.The only other active bishop in the Anglican Communion to whom Welby’s decision is known to apply is Diocese of Toronto Bishop Suffragan Kevin Robertson. He married Mohan Sharma, his partner of nearly 10 years, on Dec. 28, 2018.The statement from the House of Bishops includes a statement from the Bishops’ Spouses Planning Group saying they “join our voices with those in The Episcopal Church who have expressed their disappointment and dismay” with Welby’s decision. “We especially stand with our fellow spouse, Becki Sander, spouse of Bishop Mary Glasspool,” they said.“The spouse community understands that the Anglican Communion is not of one mind with regard to marriage, and that, in the life of the communion, this is a complex issue,” they said. “Exclusion of same-gender spouses, however, seems like a simplistic reaction to this complex issue. It saddens us that all are not welcome to walk, listen, and witness with us, and that all voices will not be heard at this gathering.”The bishops refused on a 44-42 show of hands to pass a second resolution calling on Presiding Bishop Michael Curry to ask Welby to change his mind. Curry told the house before the vote that he has had “one long conversation” with the archbishop and has exchanged letters with him as well.“I’ve got to be honest with you, I don’t expect he’ll change, but I’m willing to say that this house really would like it to be reconsidered if there is any way that it can be,” Curry said.The texts of the bishops’ statement and that of the spouses are here.Also at the meetingDiocese of San Joaquin Bishop David Rice speaks to the house on March 15, hours after the terrorist attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. Rice once served as a vicar in the Diocese of Christchurch. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe bishops responded in a number of ways to the attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, in which 49 died. The morning Eucharist included prayers for “the victims of the shootings in New Zealand, rest to their souls and peace to their families.”Diocese of San Joaquin Bishop David Rice, speaking at the opening of the morning session, called the attacks “an unprecedented act of terrorism.”Rice was the bishop of the Diocese of Waiapu in the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia when he was called to San Joaquin. Born and raised in North Carolina, Rice was a Methodist pastor for eight years prior to his ordination in the Anglican Church.He began his Anglican priesthood in the Diocese of Christchurch. It is where his daughter and son went to kindergarten and primary school, he told the house. He and his wife, Tracy, have a home there to which they will retire, Rice said.“I find myself as I stand here before you – and I should have thought of this because I was up all night contacting family and friends to see if they’re OK – to have something to say, but I find I have no words.”He said he suggested to Diocese of Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas that Bishops Against Gun Violence reach out to Christchurch Bishop Peter Carrell and Richard Wallace who leads Te Wai Pounamu, the Maori diocese, “as an act of solidarity to send our love.”Rice evoked the statement from New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern who said of the victims of the attacks, “They are us. The person who has perpetuated this violence against us is not. They have no place in New Zealand.”Rice said, “Say that with me, ‘They are us.’” The house responded loudly, and Rice stopped to compose himself.“Our immigrant and refugee sisters and brothers, say it with me, ‘They are us.’”The house responded, “They are us.”“Our Palestinian sisters and brothers, say it with me, ‘They are us.’”The house responded, “They are us.”“Those who even lose their way and do harm, say it with me, ‘They are us.’”The house responded, “They are us.”“Amen,” Rice said, returning to his table.The bishops prayed in silence and then were led in prayer by the Very Rev. Miguelina Howell, a chaplain to the house and dean of Christ Church Cathedral in Hartford, Connecticut.Later in the day, the members of Bishops Against Gun Violence who were at the meeting gathered for the group’s weekly Facebook Live prayer service, held this Friday in the chapel at Kanuga Conference and Retreat Center. The vigil included remarks by Curry.The House of Bishops passed a resolution committing itself to upholding General Convention Resolution D034, which suspends for three years the canon (church law) that places a time limit on initiating proceedings in cases of clergy sexual misconduct against adults. The church has no time limit on reporting clergy sexual misconduct against children and youth under age 21.The resolution affirms that the bishops are “intent on having robust pastoral response in all matters regarding sexual misconduct regardless of when that alleged misconduct occurred.”Diocese of Central New York Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe later told the house that the group that planned the Liturgy of Listening during the 2018 General Convention has assembled a toolkit for other Episcopalians to use for similar services.“It is our responsibility as bishops to make sure everyone is safe and to respond well when that is not true,” she said.The bishops who have taken The Episcopal Church’s pledge to protect and renew the Earth and those who live on it gathered March 15 under the trees at Kanuga Conference and Retreat Center to record a video invitation for the rest of the church to join them. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe bishops also voted to “commit ourselves, individually and corporately to live the Way of Love, practices for a Jesus-centered life, and we ask every member of The Episcopal Church to consider joining us in meeting and following Jesus through the Way of Love.”Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe Bishop Suffragan Pierre Whalon proposed the resolution, saying it grew out of the previous three days of exploring the Way of Love.Whalon and some colleagues discussed how the Way of Love could develop into a de facto strategy for the church’s mission if the bishops committed to live the Way of Love and invited other Episcopalians to join them.“We’ve had a lot of things come down the pike that were supposed to be life-changing programs, and they came along and they just continued down the pike,” Whalon said. “I believe that the Way of Love could be considered yet another program” if the bishops and the entire church do not commit to the practices it outlines.More information about the Way of Love is here.Five women bishops who have been either ordained and consecrated or elected since General Convention in July 2018 attended the March meeting. They are Arizona Bishop Jennifer Reddall, Newark Bishop Carlye Hughes, West Tennessee Bishop-elect Phoebe Roaf, Colorado Bishop-elect Kimberly D. Lucas and Kansas Bishop Cathy Bascom.The Episcopal Church House of Bishops’ women of color who attended the Kanuga meeting pose March 14 for a photo. They are, front row left to right, Indianapolis Bishop Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows, West Tennessee Bishop-elect Phoebe Roaf, Colorado Bishop-elect Kimberly D. Lucas, and retired Massachusetts Bishop Suffragan Barbara Harris; and back row, left to right, Massachusetts Bishop Suffragan Gayle Harris, Newark Bishop Carlye Hughes, Bishop Carol Gallagher (serving as Diocese of Massachusetts regional canon), and Cuba Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe House of Bishops met March 12-15. Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop Suffragan Diane Jardine Bruce, the house’s secretary, said 132 bishops attended the meeting, including three bishops-elect. Bishops-elect who have received the canonically required consents to their ordination and consecration are invited to attend the meetings. Retired Bishop Suffragan of Ohio Arthur Williams was the senior bishop present.Five of the 10 bishops who form the 2018 class are women, marking the first time in the church’s history that a class is evenly divided between women and men. Four of the 10 are persons of color, Diocese of Newark Carlye Hughes, Ecuador Litoral Bishop-elect Cristóbal León Lozano (who did not attend the meeting), Colorado Bishop-elect Kimberly D. Lucas and West Tennessee Bishop-elect Phoebe Roaf.The gathering is the group’s annual spring meeting. The bishops normally meet each spring and fall during non-General Convention years. They will next meet Sept. 17-20. Spouses are traditionally part of the fall meeting.Other ENS coverage is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI House of Bishops, Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Lambeth Conference, Submit a Job Listing By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 15, 2019 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Same-Sex Marriage Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listingcenter_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 House of Bishops Spring 2019, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishops object to Archbishop of Canterbury’s decision to exclude same-sex spouses from 2020 Lambeth Conference Majority of bishops say they will attend to ‘reflect our varied understandings of marriage’ and commitment to LGBTQ+ human rights Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN last_img read more